UW School of Dentistry

School honors outstanding staff members

The School of Dentistry has honored five outstanding staff members with its annual Distinguished Staff Awards, recognizing people whose work is vital but often goes unsung. The winners are:

  • Jen Albrecht, Service Learning Rotation Manager, Office of Regional Affairs. Said one nominator: “Jen is a delight to work with, always positive, supportive, and a good communicator to all team members.”
  • Becky Allen, Manager of Clinical Operations, Department of Orthodontics.  Nominator comment: “Her goal is to make things a win-win for all parties. This is not an easy task, but she does all of this with a ‘can-do’ attitude which has greatly improved the morale of our entire clinic, even during this past year of Covid.”
  • Virginia Daugherty, Grants Manager, Office of Regional Affairs. Nominator comments: “She takes great pride in always performing at her highest and ensuring that those around her are set up for success.” “Virginia’s positivity is absolutely infectious.”
  • Chalet White, Dental Clinic Supervisor, Sterilization. Nominator comment: “Chalet’s high expectations and standards [for] herself [are] the example her team follows for the health and safety of our patients, students, faculty, and staff.”
  • Yvonne Wilson, Dental Assistant 2, Predoctoral Clinic. Nominator comment: “She recognizes potential problems or issues for the clinic sessions and, in consultation with the clinical faculty, will offer solutions to solve the problems for the session.”

Traditionally, the winners have been honored at an annual schoolwide staff luncheon. This year, Dean Gary Chiodo, the winners and other nominees, along with their supervisors, have celebrated the recognition with smaller events in individual units. Click here for a closer look at the winners and other nominees.

“I extend my heartiest congratulations to the Distinguished Staff Award winners and to the rest of the outstanding nominees,” Dean Chiodo said. “Our excellent staff are critical to the success of our curriculum, clinics, research and service programs.”

Endodontics residents shine again in research competition

Elise Ellingsen
Dr. Elise Ellingsen

For the 16th consecutive year, UW Department of Endodontics graduate residents have won research awards at the annual meeting of the American Association of Endodontists (AAE).

Dr. Elise Ellingsen won first place in the research poster competition for her presentation titled “Determining the differentiation pathway of N-acetyl cysteine-treated SCAP.”

Dr. Lisa Sonntag won second place in the table clinic (clinical tip) presentation competition for “Achieving robust occlusal marking with one simple step.”

Lisa Sonntag
Dr. Lisa Sonntag

Dr. Melinda Lee won 10th place in the research oral presentation competition for “Effects of cold on Vortex Blue and ProTaper NiTi rotary files.”

All three residents were mentored by Dr. Avina Paranjpe of the department faculty. Dr. Sonntag was also mentored by Dr. James Johnson, chair of the department. All eight of the department’s residents, including the recently graduated Dr. Nerisa Limansubrato, took part in the competitions. Entrants included between 50 and 60 residents from endodontic programs in the United States and Canada.

Melinda Lee
Dr. Melinda Lee

The AAE, founded in 1943, is a global resource for knowledge, research and education for the profession, members, and the public. Its recent annual meeting was held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Russell Deal named Wands Fellow

The School of Dentistry has announced that Dr. Russell Deal has been named the 2020-21 David H. Wands Fellow in Graduate Prosthodontics. Dr. Deal, who received his DDS from the school in 2019, is now a first-year resident in the school’s Graduate Prosthodontics program.

Russell Deal
Russell Deal

He becomes the school’s 13th Wands Fellow and the first UW DDS alumnus to receive the fellowship since Dr. Josh Manchester, who earned his DDS in 2013 and was the 2015-16 Wands Fellow.

Dr. Deal entered the School of Dentistry after receiving his undergraduate degree in chemistry in 2015 at St. Martin’s University in Lacey, Wash. Before college, he worked for six summers as a day program volunteer with the Association for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities of Tri-Cities, supervising children and adults with developmental disabilities. He also volunteered with the Special Olympics from 2007 to 2011.

His childhood included an adventurous year and a half when the family moved to Ukraine in 1999. His father worked for a U.S. national laboratory assisting with the cleanup effort at Chernobyl after the nuclear reactor accident there. He and his brothers attended school in Slavutych, a city built expressly for the evacuated personnel of the Chernobyl power plant.

As a dental student, he volunteered for the Health and Homelessness student outreach, providing dental exams, fillings, and extractions in Mount Vernon, Wash. He was also a peer mentor in an Operative Dentistry course.

An accident at age 12 that fractured both central incisors may have been the impetus for a dental career. “I spent quite a bit of time at my family dentist and was incredibly pleased that my family dentist could fix my smile,” he said. “This artistic side to dentistry really sparked the beginning of my interest.”

David Wands
David Wands

Dr. Wands, who taught at the school in what was formerly the Department of Prosthodontics for 22 years, established the fellowship at the University of Maryland, where he received his DDS with honors in 1967 from the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. He re-launched the fellowship at the UW in 1998.

Dr. Wands practiced for seven years with the U.S. Public Health Service and later completed a graduate prosthodontics residency at the UW before joining the dental faculty. He taught both undergraduate and graduate prosthodontics, achieving the rank of Clinical Professor. Now retired from private practice, he is a life member of the Academy of Prosthodontics and Pacific Coast Society for Prosthodontics.

Dental student’s community work helps earn scholarship

Third-year University of Washington dental student Bahara Naimzadeh has been awarded a Dental Trade Alliance Foundation Scholarship for 2020, the foundation has announced.

Bahara NaimzadehNaimzadeh is a student in the School of Dentistry’s Regional Initiatives in Dental Education (RIDE) program, which is designed to funnel more dentists into rural and/or underserved areas of Washington. Since its launch in 2007, RIDE has seen about three-fourths of its graduates go on to practice in these areas, a rate far above the national average for dental schools.

Naimzadeh’s family immigrated to Western Washington from Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation of that country during the 1980s. During a visit to Afghanistan in 2008, she says, she saw the impact made by the lack of education and access to care. “I knew I wanted to be part of the solution,” she said. She sees RIDE as a “steppingstone into a career of community service,” she said.

At the UW, she has worked closely with the Hispanic Student Dental Association (HSDA) and its volunteer outreach at Seattle’s Casa Latina, which facilitates education, employment, and community organizing for the area’s Latino immigrants. As one of HSDA’s outreach coordinators, she helps organize quarterly events in which UW dental and medical students deliver urgently needed health screenings and treatment.

“Giving back to those in need is what inspired me to get into this career in dentistry,” she said. “I hope that someday I can take everything I’ve learned through my outreach and through a career in dentistry back to Afghanistan and help those people that really inspired me to be the person that I am today.”

“Bahara is so deserving of this scholarship, and I cannot think of a more fitting reward for her hard work and accomplishments,” said School of Dentistry Dean Gary Chiodo. “The RIDE program is one of our school’s crown jewels, and it is students like Bahara who help us to maintain its excellent reputation and history. Her path in coming to our dental school and the RIDE program was challenging, and her commitment to giving back to communities that are in need is impressive.”

The Dental Trade Alliance Foundation scholarships go to students at accredited dental schools who have demonstrated financial need, have a commitment to community service, and are in good academic standing. With awards ranging from $5,000 to $25,000, the program has grown since its inception in 2012, when two $5,000 awards were made. This year, the foundation will award up to 38 scholarships. A gift from the Robert J. Sullivan Family Foundation initiated the program, and further support has come from the Sullivan foundation, Dr. Edward B. Shils Entrepreneurial Fund, Crown Seating, and an anonymous donor.

Dental student receives Latino Center for Health fellowship

Mariany Morales, a third-year student at the UW School of Dentistry, has been selected to receive a UW Latino Center for Health Student Fellowship, the center has announced. She is one of 10 University of Washington Health Sciences students to receive the award in the fellowship program’s first year.

Mariany MoralesThe fellowships support the center’s mission of part of advancing the field of Latino health by building capacity to address current and emerging health issues facing diverse Latinx communities in Washington state.

“The overall aim of this program is to support the next generation of leaders and scholars who promote the health and well-being of Latinx communities in our state,” said Dr. Gino Aisenberg, associate professor in the UW School of Social Work and co-director of the center, in announcing the fellowship awards.

Morales is part of the dental school’s Regional Initiatives in Dental Education (RIDE) program. The program, which originated in 2007, seeks to improve access to care in remote and/or underserved areas of Washington, mostly east of the Cascades. Students spend their first year at the RIDE facility on the Eastern Washington University campus in Spokane, where they take classes remotely with their fellow students back in Seattle. The students also serve community clinical rotations after their first year, with a four-month rotation in their fourth and final year.

The extensive exposure to community dentistry is designed to funnel students into practice in those areas, which often have substantial Latinx populations. So far, about 75 percent of RIDE graduates have gone on to practice in Eastern Washington. Morales said that she plans to enter a one-year residency after obtaining her DDS and then become a community dentist in rural Washington.

Morales, who grew up in a migrant family in Yakima, Wash., received her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at Washington State University, where she was on the Dean’s List and won the WSU President’s Award. At the School of Dentistry, she has received the Psi Omega Scholarship, the Sea Mar Community Health Scholarship, and the Warner Lambert Scholarship.

“I chose dentistry because I wanted to be in a career where I could serve communities that are currently underrepresented,” she said. While growing up, she said, “I saw that many migrant laborers neglected their health, whether that was because of the busy lifestyle, financial hardships, cultural barriers or the mistrust in the health care system. Seeing this made me want to bridge the gap between health and the migrant community. I chose dentistry specifically because oral health is one of the areas that is most neglected.”

Morales is an officer of the UW chapter of the Hispanic Student Dental Association and serves as their lead instructor for Spanish dental terminology, helping other students improve their patient communications. She has been involved as a volunteer in dental outreaches at Seattle’s Casa Latina and in Hispanic migrant camps, as well as through Husky Smiles and Special Olympics. She also serves as a mentor to pre-health students through the Pre-Health Dreamers Program and the American Student Dental Association’s GUIDE Mentorship Program.

As an undergraduate, Morales also collaborated on entomological and other studies, with a number of them submitted or in preparation for publication. One, a study of spider mite chemical adaptation in hops fields, was published in the journal Scientific Reports in 2015.

“Mariany Morales is an outstanding and deserving candidate for this fellowship award,” said Dr. Gary Chiodo, dean of the School of Dentistry. “Her work with community organizations, including Casa Latina and outreach to Hispanic migrant camps, demonstrates her commitment to support these groups. The fact that she selected the RIDE program when she became a dental student clearly confirms her goal of serving rural and underserved communities, including those that are largely Hispanic.”

Morales said, “This fellowship not only provides me with the financial resources needed to obtain a DDS, but it refuels my dreams and aspirations to make a difference in my community. Having the support of a community such as the Latino Center for Health reminds me that I am not alone, that we are in this as a community, and that together we will advocate for our people to make sure they are heard and that their needs are met.”

Dr. Lauren Blanchard wins ethics award for patient care essay

Even as they try to deliver the best possible care, dentists can encounter tough issues related to professional ethics. Dr. Lauren Blanchard, now an orthodontics resident at the UW School of Dentistry, found herself facing just such a challenge as a fourth-year UW pre-doctoral dental student.

Head shot of Dr. Lauren BlanchardA new patient with special needs required treatment for cavities and gum problems, but his mother didn’t wanted him to receive the customary local anesthetic. Saying that he had a fear of needles, she wanted him to receive general anesthesia. Another dental office had been unable to complete his treatment.  The mother also had developed a mistrust of health-care providers, prompting her to question professional advice.

For this patient, general anesthesia would pose a significant risk – but the need for treatment was pressing. In the face of this, and considering the mother’s mistrust, how should the dentist proceed?

Dr. Blanchard grappled with these and related questions in an essay written for the American Society for Dental Ethics. And her treatment of the issues has earned her the society’s 2019 Ozar-Hasegawa Ethics Award, given annually to a dental or dental hygiene student for an essay or other form of ethical reflection.

“I am very proud of Dr. Blanchard, who shows why good patient care requires much more than technical skill,” said Interim Dean Gary Chiodo. “Her essay reflects a thoughtful, sensitive approach to her patient’s needs and a clear desire to adhere to the highest professional standards. It also reflects the values that we strive to impart to all our students.”

Dr. Blanchard met her patient and his mother during her rotation in the School of Dentistry’s DECOD program, which stands for Dental Education in Care of Persons with Disabilities. The DECOD clinic provides care for patients with acquired or development disabilities. These conditions include autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, intellectual disability, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and others.

Dr. Blanchard’s recognition is the second Ozar-Hasegawa award for a UW student in the last three years. In 2017, fourth-year student Timothée Cousin won for an essay titled “The Vulnerable Patient.”

Dr. Dianne Gan named Wands Fellow for 2019-20

Dr. Dianne Gan, a second-year Graduate Prosthodontics resident at the University of Washington School of Dentistry, has been selected as the 2019-20 David H. Wands Fellow in Graduate Prosthodontics, the school has announced.

Dr. Dianne Gan
Dr. Dianne Gan

Dr. Gan becomes the 12th recipient of the fellowship at the UW.  After expressing her appreciation for the award, she said: “This program has far exceeded my expectations. I love my co-residents. I feel like I have the smartest people from all over the world to learn from and learn with. The treatment planning seminars are very intense and provoke spirited discussion, which in my opinion is an awesome way to learn. I have also found the interdisciplinary coordination to be very unique to this program. It’s great that I can just walk next door into the Periodontics clinic and ask my colleagues surgical or prognostic questions. It’s very collaborative.”

Dr. Gan, who received her DMD at the University of Connecticut, earned a BS degree in biology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., where she won the Rensselaer Medal, a scholarship awarded to secondary students who have distinguished themselves in mathematics and science. She  completed an externship at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, worked as a research assistant at the Colgate-Palmolive Global Technology Center, and studied briefly at the University of New South Wales in Australia. She has also accompanied humanitarian dental missions to Honduras and the Amazon River basin.

In addition, her community work has included helping to teach health education at the American School for the Deaf in West Hartford, Conn.

“There are so many communities within our larger communities who don’t get the same opportunities for learning as the rest of us,” she said. “It makes me feel grateful, and the students we taught were amazing. They are some of the most hard-working and resilient humans I’ve ever met.”

Her interest in health care started early, with a number of physicians on both sides of her family, including both her parents. She, however, became the first in her family to pursue a dental career.

“Initially I thought I wanted to be an orthodontist,” she said. “I really appreciated how orthodontics changed my smile, and I wanted to be able to have that same impact on other people.” However, her direction changed after she entered dental school.

“I realized that I actually liked prepping teeth and making dentures,” she said. “I realized that I could have that same impact on people by changing their smiles in a different way. I was also excited about gaining more knowledge in order to treatment plan my future patients in the most optimal way. Now that I’ve started residency myself, I really love how much dentistry I’ve learned beyond my dental school training. We have so many methods of learning, including literature reviews, seminars, lab work, and clinical hours. It gets really busy, but I am having fun learning every day.”

She has not yet decided where she will practice after completing her residency, but wants to eventually own a practice. In addition, she said, “I definitely want to teach. I think this program really provides us with a skill set that is ideal for presenting to large audiences.”

Dr. David Wands
Dr. David Wands

That aspiration meshes well with one of the goals Dr. Wands set for the fellowship, which was to encourage recipients to enter academic dentistry and teach prosthodontics. “If we don’t have teachers in the dental school, then we don’t have graduates. It’s that simple,” he has said.

Dr. Wands, who was a UW School of Dentistry faculty member in the Department of Prosthodontics for 22 years, originally established the fellowship at the University of Maryland, where he received his DDS with honors in 1967 from the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. He practiced for seven years with the U.S., Public Health Service and later completed a graduate prosthodontics residency at the UW before joining the dental faculty. He taught both undergraduate and graduate prosthodontics, achieving the rank of Clinical Professor.

Dr. Wands initiated the fellowship at the UW in 1998 with a new $500,000 commitment, partly in appreciation for the quality of his training but also to get residents to consider pursuing academic dentistry.

He is a member of the UW School of Dentistry Dean’s Club and helped found the UW Graduate Prosthodontic Alumni Association. In 1999, he was honored by the Dean’s Club with its highest award, Honorary Lifetime Member. He is a Life Member of the Academy of Prosthodontics and Pacific Coast Society for Prosthodontics. Now retired from private practice in Olympia, Wash., he is an avid saltwater and freshwater fly fisherman, as well as, a master gardener.

Dr. Philip Anderson honored for volunteer work

Dr. Philip Anderson of the School of Dentistry affiliate faculty received a Volunteer Community Recognition Award at Thursday’s Martin Luther King Jr. Tribute program at UW Health Sciences.

Dr. Philip Anderson (right) receives his award from Butch de Castro of the MLK Tribute planning committee.
Dr. Philip Anderson (right) receives his award from Butch de Castro of the MLK Tribute planning committee.

Dr. Anderson, who has taught in the Department of Restorative Dentistry for 11 years, was honored for his extensive volunteer efforts. During his time teaching here, he has contributed more hours of volunteer work than any other faculty member.

He supervises dental students as they volunteer to deliver dental care at Seattle-area homeless shelters, including the Union Gospel Mission, Mary’s Place, and Safe Harbor Free Medical Clinic. He has also served in this capacity at migrant farm worker dental outreach events.

Last year, Dr. Anderson launched and underwrote an award recognizing student volunteer efforts. A 1972 DDS graduate of the UW, he was also recognized in 2015 with one of the first two Hungate Awards for Teaching Excellence recognizing the School of Dentistry’s affiliate faculty.

Each year, UW Health Sciences commemorates Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a program focusing on the work being done to honor his ideals. The event includes the presentation of Volunteer Community Recognition Awards to someone from Dentistry and the five other Health Sciences schools.

At this year’s event, Annette Anderson, Director of Curriculum at UW Bothell, received the Distinguished Service Award. The program also featured a panel discussion of the role of health equity in serving the community, moderated by Dr. Donald Chi of the School of Dentistry faculty.

3 faculty members receive school’s top honor

The School of Dentistry honored three faculty members on Monday with the presentation of its annual Bruce R. Rothwell Teaching Awards, the school’s highest such recognition.

3 people with flowers and award
Dr. John Townsend (center) with Dr. Mark Drangsholt and Dr. Patricia Rothwell.

Awards went to Dr. John Townsend, a lecturer emeritus in the Department of Restorative Dentistry; Dr. Avina Paranjpe, associate professor in the Department of Endodontics; and Dr. Robert Nieman, a clinical instructor with the Advanced General Dentistry Clinic of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

Dr. Townsend received the Rothwell Lifetime Achievement in Teaching Award. During his career, he has served on the faculty at both the UW and McGill University in Montreal, and chaired a department at each school. At the UW, he has been a key figure in the Graduate Prosthodontics program, and has received four Outstanding Instructor Awards bestowed by students. He also received the rare honor of selection by graduating students to be

3 people with flowers and award
Dr. Avina Paranjpe (center) with Dr. Mark Drangsholt and Dr. Patricia Rothwell.

keynote speaker for the School of Dentistry’s 2014 commencement.

Dr. Townsend has been nominated several times previously for the Rothwell Award. On one of those occasions, the Class of 2015 offered this illustration of his qualities as a teacher: “Dr. Townsend is also an excellent storyteller and dental historian, often sharing stories in class about how dental materials came to be and challenging us to use a critical eye when evaluating new dental products. He put a story behind the materials we use, making them more interesting and easier to understand.”

Dr. Paranjpe received the Rothwell Distinguished Teaching Award. She too has been nominated several times previously, and this year received a fellowship to attend the 2018-19 American Dental Education Association Leadership Institute. This program is designed to groom dental faculty members as future leaders in dental and higher education. Dr. Paranjpe was also selected as the 2018 ADEA/American Association of Endodontists Foundation Scholar for the Leadership Institute.

3 people with flowers and award
Dr. Robert Nieman (center) with Dr. Mark Drangsholt and Dr. Patricia Rothwell.

One letter supporting her nomination for the Rothwell Award included this: “Dr. Paranjpe is held in high regard by her students in the most profound ways. Her organization is renowned among students and residents alike, and her ability to simplify the most arduous of concepts makes her a fantastic mentor. … Dr. Paranjpe maintains incredibly high standards for her students, but year after year they strive to meet them – not for grades, but for respect of their instructor and their goal to demonstrate what they’ve learned from her.”

Dr. Neiman, who has also been nominated multiple times, received the Rothwell Distinguished Teaching Award for Outstanding Service. A former director of the school’s General Practice Residency (GPR) program, he served as an attending dentist in that program and in the Advanced General Dentistry program, which serves medically complex patients, for nearly 40 years.

One nominating letter said: “Bob has been the stable bedrock for the GPR program and its residents. … Simply put, Bob has been the best mentor and teacher one could hope for. Of all the excellent dental educators I have had at the School of Dentistry, there is none more deserving of this award than Bob Nieman, and I think Bruce would be proud of his colleague and friend.”

Bruce Rothwell
Dr. Bruce R. Rothwell

The Rothwell Awards commemorate the late Dr. Bruce R. Rothwell, who chaired the Department of Restorative Dentistry at the UW from 1993 until his death from kidney cancer in 2000 at the age of 52.

Renowned as a forensic dentist, he served as a consultant to the King County Medical Examiner’s Office and in the 1980s worked with UW colleague Dr. Tom Morton to identify victims in the Green River serial murder case. He was posthumously honored by the American Society of Forensic Odontology.

Dr. Rothwell also directed the School of Dentistry’s GPR program and was noted for his expertise in teaching, research and care of medically compromised patients. He devised Rothwell’s Solution, a painkilling mouthwash still in use to help patients undergoing radiation and chemotherapy for mouth cancers.

The awards were presented by Dr. Patricia Rothwell, who was Dr. Rothwell’s wife, and Dr. Mark Drangsholt, Chair of the Department of Oral Medicine and chair of the award selection committee.

Student competition winners announced at Research Day

At the School of Dentistry’s annual Research Day on Tuesday, Kristie Cheng was announced as the winner of the Summer Research Fellowship (SURF) Student Clinician Competition. Cheng, a second-year dental student, presented a study of factors affecting citation rates in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Kristie Cheng
Second-year dental student Kristie Cheng won the Summer Research Fellowship Student Clinician Competition.

Runners-up in the SURF competition were second-year dental students Taylor Wilkins and Mark Van Duker. Wilkins presented a study of genotype-dependent T2R38 regulation of epigenetic markers and antimicrobial peptides, while Van Duker studied the effect of silver diamine fluoride and potassium iodide on bonding to caries-affected dentin.

Dr. Jevin West of the UW School of Information delivered the Research Day keynote talk, titled “Sorting Evidence from BS in the Age of Evidence-Based Dentistry,” at the start of the day’s activities in the UW’s South Campus Center.

He told students that even when they don’t know how an algorithm or a statistical test works, they can spot research flaws by looking carefully at what goes in and what comes out of a study.

Jevin West
Dr. Jevin West of UW’s Information School delivered the Research Day keynote talk.

He focused closely on the issue of causality and warned of the dangers of confusing a simple common cause with cause and effect. He also noted that correlations may not be prescriptive in research, but they turn out that way as a research proceeds from an original paper to the news and public awareness. As an example, he cited findings that moderate wine consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, which somehow became a popular prescription to drink a glass with dinner to reduce the chance of heart disease.

He also discussed “post hoc ergo propter hoc,” the logical fallacy stating that since one event follows another, the second event must have been caused by the first. This fallacy is especially prevalent in medicine, he said, citing the contention that vaccines caused autism – a widely discredited assertion that nevertheless has caused thousands of preventable deaths.

He cautioned students to guard against this fallacy and said that the best way to determine true causality was through manipulative experimentation – changing variables and studying carefully how they affect outcomes. A key question, he said, would be to ask whether causality was direct or mediated by a common cause.

He also called on students to support efforts to spread public awareness. “Science works, but given the amount pseudoscience out there, we need to engage with the public,” he said.

Other presentations were given by Dr. Greg Huang, Chair of the Department of Orthodontics; Dr. Brian Leroux of the Departments of Oral Health Sciences and Biostatistics; and Dr. Philippe Hujoel of the Department of Oral Health Sciences.

After the morning’s talks, student research poster presentations followed in the UW’s Health Sciences Center lobby.

Dr. Avina Paranjpe selected for leadership training program

Dr. Paranjpe Dr. Avina Paranjpe, Associate Professor in the Department of Endodontics, has received a fellowship to attend the 2018-19 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute is a yearlong program designed to groom dental faculty members as future leaders in dental and higher education.

The program aims to help participants gain skills in decision-making, priority-setting, and conflict resolution; improve their administrative skills; learn the inner workings of a dental education institution and how it fits into a parent institution; and learn about policy issues affecting academic dentistry.

Activities include training sessions in Colorado Springs, Colo., and at ADEA headquarters in Washington, D.C., plus a legislative workshop at ADEA headquarters.

In addition, Dr. Paranjpe was selected as the 2018 ADEA/American Association of Endodontists (AAE) Foundation Scholar for the Leadership Institute. The award carries a $25,000 stipend to cover tuition and fees for the Leadership Institute.

“This is a tremendous award for a very talented and gifted educator who represents the future of dental education,” said Dr. James Johnson, Interim Dean of the School of Dentistry. “Being selected for the Leadership Institute is a great honor, but to receive the AAE scholarship is just as great an accomplishment.”

Dr. Paranjpe, who in addition to her teaching duties served as Chair of the Faculty Council at the School of Dentistry last year, also holds the Department of Endodontics’ first endowed faculty fellowship, which is supported by contributions from alumni and the AAE.

She is the second Department of Endodontics faculty member in as many years to become a Leadership Institute fellow. Dr. Natasha Flake also received the 2017 ADEA/AAE Foundation Scholarship for the Leadership Institute.

Dr. Paranjpe received a Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree from India’s Mumbai University in 2000 and practiced privately in Mumbai until 2002. She then earned an MS in oral biology in 2004 and a PhD in immunology in 2007 from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Paranjpe then earned a Master of Science in Dentistry and Certificate in Endodontics from the University of Washington School of Dentistry in 2009, after which she joined the faculty.

She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Endodontics, and has conducted research on dental materials and regenerative endodontics. She has numerous research publications on subjects including pulpal regeneration and revascularization, immunology, and compatibility of biomaterials.

Prosthodontics students take honors in research competition

Dr.  Michele Buda and Dr. Konstantina Angelara, recently graduated residents in the School of Dentistry’s Graduate Prosthodontics program, have won first and third place respectively in the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics’ annual Tylman Award competition.

Dr. Michele Buda
Dr. Michele Buda

Dr. Buda won top honors for his study titled “Accuracy of 3D CAM manufactured single-tooth implant master casts,” while Dr. Angelara placed third for her study titled “Comparison of strength of milled and conventionally processed PMMA full arch implant immediate provisional fixed dental prostheses.”

The Tylman Awards are presented for outstanding postdoctoral student research in fixed prosthodontics supported by grants issued by the academy in its Stanley D. Tylman Research Program. Up to four of the $4,000 grants are awarded each year to full-time students enrolled in U.S. or Canadian postdoctoral programs who are conducting research in fixed prosthodontics. This is the dental specialty devoted to  permanently attached prostheses, including crowns, bridges, inlays, onlays, and veneers. These are also known as indirect restorations.

Dr. Konstantina Angelara
Dr. Konstantina Angelara

Drs. Buda and Angelara, who completed their residencies in June, will be recognized and will give poster presentations on their research at the academy’s annual meeting in Chicago in February 2018.

“I’m extremely proud of these outstanding students,” said Dr. John Sorensen, the faculty member who oversaw the Tylman entries. He noted that the new awards continue a string of strong UW performances in the Tylman competition. Dr. Amand Putra placed second last year and Dr. Manuel Bratos placed third, while Graduate Prosthodontics residents also received awards in the two previous years.

Program residents have also won grants and research competitions from the Pacific Coast Society of Prosthodontists and the Academy of Prosthodontics, Dr. Sorensen also noted.

“Congratulations to Dr. Buda and Dr. Angelara for their excellent work, and to Dr. Van Ramos, our Graduate Prosthodontics program chair,” said Dean Joel Berg. “I especially want to recognize the extraordinary efforts of Dr. Sorensen, who has done so much to bolster the program’s research component and for his mentorship of these students.”

Wands Fellow in prosthodontics named for 2017-18

The University of Washington School of Dentistry has announced the award of the David H. Wands Fellowship in Graduate Prosthodontics for 2017-18 to Dr. Jack Keesler.

Dr. Keesler is the 15th recipient of the $10,000 fellowship, which was established by Dr. Wands, a longtime member of the Graduate Prosthodontics faculty at the UW who is now retired. He created the fellowship endowment to support and inspire recipients to pursue an academic career, either full or part time, in prosthodontics education.

“If we don’t have teachers in the dental school, then we don’t have graduates. It’s that simple,” Dr. Wands has said.

Joel Berg, Van Ramos, Jack Keesler, John Townsend
At the School of Dentistry’s Honors and Awards ceremony, Dr. Jack Keesler (holding plaque) receives his Wands Fellowship from (from left) Dean Joel Berg; Dr. Van Ramos, director of the UW Graduate Prosthodontics program; and Dr. John Townsend of the Department of Restorative Dentistry.

Dr. Keesler, a native of Wisconsin, earned his DDS from Marquette University in Milwaukee in 2016 after receiving his BS in biological science there in 2012. He said that he decided on prosthodontics in part because of discussions with his uncle, a prosthodontist for whom he worked during high school.

“I thought this was the thing for me,” he said. “Prosthodontics is the most artistic specialty.” Dr. Keesler is also a painter who works in oils and watercolors and has had his work shown at a museum back home in Neenah, Wis.

“I was drawn to the UW Graduate Prosthodontics program because of my mentor at Marquette, Dr. Michael Waliszewski, who taught our denture course,” he said. Dr. Waliszewski, who received his prosthodontics certification from the UW in 2005, became the first Wands Fellow here in 2003. The fellowship was initially established at the University of Maryland in 1994.

“Also, the wonderful reputation of the program and the numerous skilled practitioners who have graduated from here were a big draw,” Dr. Keesler added.

Dr. Keesler said he has not yet made firm post-residency plans, but knows that he would like to teach at least part-time at Marquette or another dental school.

Dr. David Wands
Dr. David Wands

Dr. Wands, who was a UW School of Dentistry faculty member in the Department of Prosthodontics for 22 years, originally established the fellowship at the University of Maryland in 1994 in recognition of the shortage of dental school educators and to offer financial assistance to those interested in academic dentistry. In 1998, he launched a similar fellowship at the UW with a $500,000 commitment.

In 1967, Dr. Wands graduated with honors from the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery at the University of Maryland, and afterward served for seven years with the U.S. Public Health Service. He then returned to the University of Washington as a half-time faculty member and taught both undergraduate and graduate Prosthodontics, achieving the rank of Clinical Professor.

In addition to endowing the fellowship, Dr. Wands is a member of the UW School of Dentistry Dean’s Club and was instrumental in forming the UW Graduate Prosthodontic Alumni Association. In 1999, he was honored by the Dean’s Club with its highest award, Honorary Lifetime Member. He is a Life Member of the Academy of Prosthodontics and Pacific Coast Society for Prosthodontics.

Now retired from private practice in Olympia, Wash., he is an avid saltwater and freshwater fisherman as well as a master gardener.

UW regional dental education program wins national award

A groundbreaking School of Dentistry program that seeks to improve access to dental care in rural and underserved areas of Washington state has received the top award in dental education.

The UW’s Regional Initiatives in Dental Education (RIDE) program, which began in 2008, was named recipient of the 2017 William J. Gies Award for Vision by an Academic Dental Institution, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) announced Monday.

The Gies awards, which are bestowed by the ADEA Gies Foundation, began in 2008 and are named after the late William J. Gies, a Columbia University biochemistry professor who is considered the founder of modern dental education. In 1926, he published The Gies Report: Dental Education in the United States and Canada, which established the importance of dentistry as a healing science, a learned profession, and an essential component of higher education in the health professions.

RIDE students in Spokane (on video monitor), shown taking a test with their Seattle classmates, are connected to the School of Dentistry by distance-learning technology.
RIDE students in Spokane (on video monitor), shown taking a test with their Seattle classmates, are connected to the School of Dentistry by distance-learning technology.

“Speaking on behalf of all the RIDE faculty and staff, I want to thank the ADEA Gies Foundation for recognizing us with this prestigious award,” said Dr. Wendy Mouradian, RIDE’s founder and now a strategic advisor for the program’s expansion.

“RIDE has been a mission-based program from the beginning,” Dr. Mouradian said. “This commitment to improving access to oral health in rural and underserved communities has enabled us to build RIDE into a program that recruits, selects and trains dental students for service in these areas. Our success in placing students in these communities is the result of the concerted effort of many stakeholders – including our state Legislature – to make this vision a reality. It has been so gratifying to work with a group of committed students who are making a difference in in meeting the needs of our underserved communities.”

“We are very honored to have the RIDE program recognized by the American Dental Education Association with the 2017 Gies Award,” said Dr. Frank Roberts, RIDE program director. “We are especially grateful for our wonderful partners and the outstanding community health dental clinics of Central and Eastern Washington. We look forward to growing this incredible program.”

“RIDE has provided us with many useful lessons as we implement our Dentist of the Future curriculum, and it is one of the keys to our excellence as a school,” said School of Dentistry Dean Joel Berg.

The partners cited by Dr. Roberts include RIDE’s principal collaborators, Eastern Washington University (EWU) and the UW School of Medicine’s WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho) regional program. Others are the Spokane District Dental Society, Washington State Dental Association, and Washington Dental Service Foundation.

RIDE students such as Patty Martin spend several weeks in fourth-year community clinical rotations in Eastern Washington, and most go on to practice east of the mountains. Dr. Martin, who graduated with the first RIDE cohort in 2012, practices in Walla Walla.
RIDE students such as Patty Martin spend several weeks in fourth-year community clinical rotations in Eastern Washington, and most go on to practice east of the mountains. Dr. Martin, who graduated with the first RIDE cohort in 2012, practices in Walla Walla.

RIDE accepts eight entrants each year, with students spending their first year at EWU’s Spokane campus, which is jointly operated by EWU and Washington State University. There they take dental courses from on-site instructors and from UW School of Dentistry faculty in Seattle, to whom they are connected by a distance-learning network. Dental students also take some classes side by side with medical students and dental hygiene students.

After serving a month-long community clinical rotation in the summer after their first year, RIDE students return to Seattle and spend their second, third and first part of fourth year studying with the rest of their UW dental classmates. Later in fourth year, they embark on an extended rotation of four to six months at one of several Eastern Washington community clinics which are part of RIDE’s teledentistry network.

These extended rotations increase students’ familiarity with rural and underserved populations and let them learn more about practice opportunities in these communities, according to RIDE officials. The Eastern Washington connection also improves that chances that RIDE graduates will practice in the rural and underserved areas of the State, RIDE officials say. To date, about 70 percent of RIDE graduates have returned to practice in such communities.

The School of Dentistry hopes to expand the RIDE program to 30 students a year, and has already begun collaborating with the Montana Dental Association to create community clinical rotations in that state. Plans for expansion call for an enhanced Spokane training facility, which would let students also spend their second year of dental school in Spokane.

“Few programs have enjoyed such a high level of success as RIDE, thanks to a combination of far-sighted vision and careful, process-oriented planning and evaluation,” said Dean Berg. “We owe a great debt to Dr. Wendy Mouradian, whose vision and determination as Associate Dean of Regional Affairs were instrumental in establishing this program and ensuring its successful start.”

The 2017 Gies Awards will be presented on March 20 at ADEA’s annual meeting in Long Beach, Calif. In addition to the RIDE program, eight other winners will be recognized.

2 faculty, alumna sweep evidence-based dentistry awards

Two University of Washington School of Dentistry faculty members and one alumna have received all three of the 2015 Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) Faculty and Practice Awards given by the American Dental Association (ADA) and American Association for Dental Research (AADR), the organizations have announced.

Greg Huang
Dr. Greg Huang

The awards went to Dr. Greg Huang, Professor and Chair of the Department of Orthodontics; Dr. Donald Chi, Associate Professor in the Department of Oral Health Sciences; and Dr. Jane Gillette, a Montana clinical research dentist and 2002 UW dental graduate who has been a national leader in advocating for wider use of EBD.

Dr.  Huang received the Accomplished Faculty Award and Dr. Chi received the Mid-Career Faculty Award, while Dr. Gillette received the Practice Award. The awards, which recognize significant contributions to implementing and advancing EBD, will be presented on Nov. 4 at a joint reception of the ADA’s EBD Champions Conference and the AADR Fall Focused Symposium in Washington, D.C. Established two years ago, the awards initially were given just to dental faculty but were expanded this year to include a practitioner.

“It’s very gratifying to see these two outstanding faculty members and Dr. Gillette recognized in this way,” said Dr. Joel Berg, Dean of the School of Dentistry. “Beyond that, I think this also underscores the enormous value our school places on research and scientific evidence. They are absolutely essential to our educational and clinical mission at the University of Washington.”

Dr. Huang, who earned his DMD at University of Florida and his MSD in orthodontics at the UW, has published more than 70 journal articles and is co-author of the first textbook on evidence-based orthodontics. He was an associate editor for the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics from 2004 to 2013, and he currently serves on the editorial boards of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research and Seminars in Orthodontics. His studies have also ranged outside orthodontics; in recent years, his research on the advisability of third-molar (wisdom tooth) extraction has drawn substantial interest. Dr. Huang, who also holds an MPH in epidemiology, is the principal investigator of a current study being carried out in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network, a consortium of dentists conducting research in their private practices. He has lectured on evidence-based orthodontics across the world, and his honors include the 2014 Award of Merit from the Pacific Coast Society for Orthodontics.

Donald Chi
Dr. Donald Chi

Dr. Chi, who also holds an adjunct appointment in the UW School of Public Health, has a DDS from the UW and a PhD in health services research from the University of Iowa. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts, abstracts, and book chapters. His wide-ranging research interests include access to dental care services, Alaska Native pediatric oral health disparities, oral health of low-income children with special health care needs, and the relationship between medical and dental care utilization. He is the first dentist and UW faculty member to be named a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar, and in 2013 he received the International Association for Dental Research Colgate Community-Based Research Award for Caries Prevention and the Bengt Magnusson Memorial Prize in Child Dental Health from the International Association of Pediatric Dentistry. He is a consultant to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) Council on Scientific Affairs and chair of the AAPD Evidence-Based Dentistry Committee. His clinical practice focuses on providing comprehensive dental care to Alaska Native children in Alaska’s Yukon Kuskokwim Delta.

Jane Gillette
Dr. Jane Gillette

Dr. Gillette is a nationally recognized leader in primary oral disease prevention, health disparities and EBD, with experience in settings including the Federal Dental Service, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Alaskan Native and Native American health care, private practice, and academia and research.  She has held leadership roles in organizations including the ADA, the National Network for Oral Health Access, the AAPD, and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-funded practice-based research networks.  She is one of the nation’s leading advocates for reducing oral health disparities and improving health outcomes via the production and utilization of high-quality scientific evidence, and she is an ADA spokesperson on EBD and reviewer of scientific evidence for the ADA’s Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry. Dr. Gillette is also an editor of the Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, and developer and director of both the infant oral health program Access to Baby and Child Dentistry Montana and Montana’s school-based sealant program Sealants for Smiles!.

Dr. Natasha Flake receives 2nd national teaching award

Dr. Natasha Flake, Associate Professor in the Department of Endodontics, has received the 2016 Edward M. Osetek Educator Award from the American Association of Endodontists (AAE), the organization has announced.

Natasha FlakeThis marks the second national dental faculty award for Dr. Flake, who in 2010 received the American Dental Education Association Junior Faculty Award. The Osetek award is given to a faculty member with less than 10 years’ experience who is held in exceptional regard by students and colleagues; has produced students who have had an impact on endodontics; and is frequently invited to lecture or make presentations at other educational or research institutions.

In December, Dr. Flake also received the School of Dentistry’s highest teaching honor, the Bruce R. Rothwell Distinguished Teaching Award.

“I could not be prouder of Dr. Flake, and I know that Dr. Osetek would have been proud to have her receive this award,” said Dr. James Johnson, Chair of the UW Department of Endodontics, who noted that the late Dr. Osetek was his mentor and program director during his endodontics residency at the Northwestern University School of Dentistry.

Dr. Johnson also noted that Dr. Flake has chaired the AAE’s Research and Scientific Affairs Committee and was selected for a rare second term in that post. She has also chaired the School of Dentistry’s Faculty Committee.

When Dr. Flake received promotion to tenured status, the faculty review committee’s chair said that the panel’s members – all of them senior faculty – “had never seen a teaching package as strong as Dr. Flake’s. Both in quantity and quality, her proven performance as an endodontics instructor is astonishing.”

In his nominating letter to the AAE, Dr. Johnson also called Dr. Flake “a shining example to our students of what ethical conduct should be in the dental profession.”

Earlier this spring, Dr. Flake was chosen to direct the School of Dentistry’s new third-year system of “clerkship” clinical rotations, a key element in the school’s comprehensive overhaul of its curriculum. She is currently director of pre-doctoral endodontics instruction.

“One of the biggest issues in dental education today is the difficulty of attracting and retaining talented  younger full-time dental faculty,” said Dean Joel Berg. “We all share tremendous pride in Dr. Flake’s  achievements and recognition, and we know how  fortunate we are to have her in this critical position as we move into the next phase of our curriculum transformation..”

Dr. Flake received a DDS degree and a PhD degree in neuroscience from the University of Maryland, then served an endodontics residency and earned her MSD degree and certification in that specialty at the University of Washington in 2007. She joined the School of Dentistry faculty immediately afterward.

Dr. Atriya Salamati named UW Magnuson Scholar

Dr. Atriya Salamati, a PhD candidate in oral biology at the School of Dentistry, has been named a 2015-16 University of Washington Magnuson Scholar, one of the UW’s highest awards.

The six annual recipients – one from each of the UW’s Health Sciences schools – are chosen for the $30,000 award on the basis of academic performance and potential contributions to research in the health sciences.

Dr. Atriya Salamati
Dr. Atriya Salamati

Dr. Salamati, who earned her DDS at the UW in 2013, is pursuing a doctorate in oral biology in the School of Dentistry’s DDS/PhD program. Her research project involves measuring tooth mobility both in health and in periodontal disease. It could eventually help clinicians develop a prognosis and establish treatment plans for children and adults who are prone to diabetes, periodontal disease, and other conditions leading to loosened teeth.

“I am extremely grateful and honored to be a recipient of this prestigious award,” said Dr. Salamati, who was notified of the award on her birthday. “This generosity inspires me even more to work harder toward my goals to further research in health sciences. I look forward to a day that I can give back and support young scientists.”

“We’re tremendously proud of Atriya,” said Dean Joel Berg. “The dentist of the future will be a true clinician-scientist, and she has already begun to embody that ideal.”

Dr. Susan Herring, who is Dr. Salamati’s research mentor, said, “Atriya has impressed all of us with her persistence and intelligence in pursuing these difficult experiments.”

After she earns her PhD, Dr. Salamati said, she would like to pursue a residency in pediatric dentistry. Eventually, she hopes to take up a career in academic dentistry while also providing patient care and performing research.

After growing up in Iran, she moved with her family to New York after she finished high school. The family eventually moved to Seattle, where Atriya and her younger sister, Nayrika, attended community college and then the UW, where they also received their dental degrees in the same graduating class.

The Magnuson Scholars program commemorates the late Sen. Warren G. Magnuson of Washington, a leading advocate of biomedical research who played a key role in establishing the National Institutes of Health, Medicare and Medicaid. He is also the namesake of the UW’s Magnuson Health Sciences Center.

Dr. Dodson wins Gies Award as specialty educator

Dr. Thomas Dodson, Chair of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, has received a William J. Gies Foundation Award for distinguished achievement as a specialty dental educator.

Dr. Dodson and Dr. Geist
Dr. Thomas Dodson (left) receives his Gies Award from Dr. Eric Geist, president of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

The award was presented by Dr. Eric Geist, president of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS), during the association’s recent annual meeting in Honolulu. In his presentation, Dr. Geist said, “Dr. Dodson’s commitment to academic OMS has been the hallmark of his 25-year career.” He noted Dr. Dodson’s work as associate editor of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and as principal investigator for an AAOMS-supported study assessing outcomes on office-based anesthesia and third molar extractions. In addition, he noted, Dr. Dodson was co-author of the AAOMS white papers on bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the Jaw, and a designated specialty spokesperson on the topic of third-molar (wisdom tooth) management.

“And all this is done during the hours in which he is not mentoring residents and junior faculty, or working to ensure the sustainability of OMS through clinical excellence, research, expanded funding, and community outreach,” Dr. Geist said.

“It is a privilege to be able to do what I do every day, but to be recognized by my colleagues in this way is a singular honor,” Dr. Dodson said. “This award confirms what many of us already knew: Tom Dodson is an outstanding national leader in dentistry,” Dean Joel Berg said. “He brings tremendous vision, energy and dedication to his work every day, and we’re so very fortunate to have him here at the UW.”

Dr. Dodson came to the UW in September 2013 from the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, where he was Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Attending Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. He was also Director of the Center for Applied Clinical Investigation in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital.

In the past year, he has launched plans to re-establish the MD/certificate Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery residency program at the UW and begun hosting a well-received “Grand Rounds” lecture series for oral and maxillofacial surgeons, other dentists and students, and physicians. He has also augmented faculty at his department’s satellite clinic at Harborview Medical Center as part of his goal to expand clinical, research and educational opportunities there.

Dr. Dodson, who received both his dental degree and a Master of Public Health degree at Harvard, completed his oral surgery training at the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF). After residency training, he completed a dental public health residency and a National Institutes of Health fellowship in dental clinical epidemiology at UCSF. He has also served on the dental and public health faculties at Emory University in Atlanta.

An active researcher credited with more than 100 journal articles, he has pursued studies including risk factors for complications after third molar extraction and implant placement as well as evaluating risks and repair of nerve injury, management of giant cell tumors, and bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. His research interests have also ranged far outside dentistry, including studies of the efficacy of mandatory seatbelt laws, oral surgical management of HIV-positive patients, and identifying markers for domestic violence.

He won the Harvard dental school’s Distinguished Senior Faculty Award and twice won the Daniel M. Laskin Award for most outstanding article published in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

OKU honorary awards scholarships, inducts new members

Dean Joel Berg congratulates the OKU honorees.
Dean Joel Berg congratulates the OKU honorees.

The UW chapter of the Omicron Kappa Upsilon dental honorary society awarded scholarships to the top two students in each of the classes of 2015, 2016 and 2017 and also inducted new faculty and graduating student members at its annual banquet on May 28 at the UW Club.

In addition, the OKU chapter bestowed the Dr. William S. Kramer Award of Excellence on Anisoara Begun of the Class of 2016. The award is given to a rising third-year dental student in recognition of scholarship, character and the potential promise for the advancement of dentistry and service to humanity.

Scholarships, awarded on the basis of class standing, went to Kathryn Parker (first) and Cameron Lasley (second), Class of 2015; Chelsea Momany (first) and Christopher Davis (second), Class of 2016; and David Shin (first) and Yelena Chuvashova (second), Class of 2017.

Dr. Patrick Taylor of the Department of Endodontics affiliate faculty was inducted as a faculty member, while Diane Daubert of the Department of Periodontics faculty received honorary membership.

Seven graduating fourth-year students were inducted as new alumni members: Leigh Armijo, Dallin Dance, Shane Drew, Allison Millard, Tyler Morgan, Hunter Simpson and Timothee Souquet.

Dr. Mats Kronstrom (far left), OKU chapter president, and Dr. Hai Zhang (far right) join scholarship winners (from left) Kathryn Parker, Cameron Laseley, Chelsea Momany, Christopher Davis and David Shin. Not shown: Yelena Chuvashova.
Dr. Mats Kronstrom (far left), OKU chapter president, and Dr. Hai Zhang (far right) join scholarship winners (from left) Kathryn Parker, Cameron Laseley, Chelsea Momany, Christopher Davis and David Shin. Not shown: Yelena Chuvashova.
Dr. Art DiMarco (far left), chapter president-elect, and Dr. Mats Kronstrom  (far right) join the new alumni inductees from the Class of 2014 (from left): Timothee Souquet, Hunter Simpson, Allison Millard, Shane Drew, Dallin Dance and Leigh Armijo. Not shown: Tyler Morgan.
Dr. Art DiMarco (far left), chapter president-elect, and Dr. Mats Kronstrom (far right) join the new alumni inductees from the Class of 2014 (from left): Timothee Souquet, Hunter Simpson, Allison Millard, Shane Drew, Dallin Dance and Leigh Armijo. Not shown: Tyler Morgan.
Dr. Mats Kronstrom (left) and Dr. Hai Zhang congratulate Anisoara Begun, winner of the Dr. William S. Kramer Award of Excellence.
Dr. Mats Kronstrom (left) and Dr. Hai Zhang congratulate Anisoara Begun, winner of the Dr. William S. Kramer Award of Excellence.
Sandi Phillips (left), chapter vice president, and Dr. Mats Kronstrom congratulate honorary faculty inductee Diane Daubert.
Sandi Phillips (left), chapter vice president, and Dr. Mats Kronstrom congratulate honorary faculty inductee Diane Daubert.

Three students receive national scholarship awards

School of Dentistry students Jose Mendoza, Chelsea Momany and Todd Billington have received national scholarship awards.

Jose Mendoza
Jose Mendoza

Mendoza, a first-year student, received a 2013 Annual Hispanic Health Professional Student Scholarship from the National Hispanic Health Foundation, affiliated with the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. He accepted the two-year, $5,000 award last November at the Sixth Annual California Scholarship Gala in Los Angeles.

Mendoza was one of two first-year dental students out of 20 health profession students to receive the award. He participated in the U-DOC at UW, a five-week residential summer enrichment program for high school students interested in health careers.

All scholarship recipients – which include medical, nursing, public health and policy students – exhibited exceptional academic performance, leadership and commitment to the Hispanic community.

Chelsea Momany
Chelsea Momany

Mendoza and 10 other students received the $5,000 scholarship, funded through the United Health Foundation. Nine were given $2,000 for one year.

Momany, a second-year student, was awarded the 2013 American Dental Association Foundation’s Predoctoral Dental Student Scholarship.  She was one of 25 recipients of this annual scholarship, which helps academically gifted second-year predoctoral dental students defray a part of their professional education expenses. The ADAF accepts one application per school per program, submitted by the school on behalf of the student. Awards of up to $2,500 each are bestowed.

Todd Billington
Todd Billington

Billington, a third-year student who was one of the School’s AmeriCorps students in summer 2012, received the 2013 ADEA/Johnson & Johnson Healthcare Products Preventive Dentistry Scholarship.

This yearly scholarship awards $2,500 toward tuition and fees to 12 predoctoral dental students who have demonstrated academic excellence in preventive dentistry. The scholarships are provided through an educational grant from Johnson & Johnson Consumer & Personal Products Worldwide, a division of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies. Students are nominated by their dental school dean or dean’s designate.

Dr. Beirne, Dr. Johnson receive Rothwell teaching awards

Dr. O. Ross Beirne of the UW Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dr. Glen Johnson of the UW Department of Restorative Dentistry have received the 2013 Bruce R. Rothwell Distinguished Teaching Awards, the School of Dentistry’s highest teaching honor.

Dr. O. Ross Beirne (center) receives the Bruce R. Rothwell Lifetime Achievement Award from Dr. Mark Drangsholt and Dr. Patricia Rothwell.
Dr. O. Ross Beirne (center) receives the Bruce R. Rothwell Lifetime Achievement Award from Dr. Mark Drangsholt and Dr. Patricia Rothwell.

Dr. Beirne received the Rothwell Lifetime Achievement Award, while Dr. Johnson received the Rothwell Distinguished Teacher Award for outstanding and innovative teaching. The awards were presented during the School’s faculty retreat at the Husky Union Building on Dec. 13.

Dr. Beirne, who chaired his department for 11 years until stepping down in 2010 to devote more time to teaching and patient care, was cited for an unobtrusive, effective teaching style that gives students the leeway to learn without constant intervention. He received his DMD from Harvard University in 1972 and a PhD in biochemistry from the University of California at San Francisco in 1976.

Expressing his gratitude with great emotion, Dr. Beirne said, “It’s wonderful to be recognized for something you love doing.”

Dr. Glen Johnson (center) receives the Bruce R. Rothwell Distinguished Teacher Award from Dr. Mark Drangsholt and Dr. Patricia Rothwell.
Dr. Glen Johnson (center) receives the Bruce R. Rothwell Distinguished Teacher Award from Dr. Mark Drangsholt and Dr. Patricia Rothwell.

Dr. Johnson, who has taught restorative dentistry for more than 32 years at the UW, received his DDS from the UW in 1978. The selection committee cited wide praise for his teaching method of focusing not only on getting students to learn how a procedure is done, but why.

“I feel like one of the luckiest guys around, to be part of this process,” Dr. Johnson said. “I feel like I’ve given some, but I’ve gained so much.”

The Rothwell awards are named for the late Dr. Bruce R. Rothwell, who was Chair of Restorative Dentistry at the UW from 1993 until his death from kidney cancer in 2000 at the age of 52. Renowned as a forensic dentist, he served as a consultant to the King County Medical Examiner’s Office and in the 1980s worked with UW colleague Dr. Tom Morton to identify victims in the Green River serial murder case.   He was posthumously honored by the American Society of Forensic Odontology.

Dr. Rothwell also directed the School of Dentistry’s General Practice Residency program and was noted for his expertise in teaching, research and care of medically compromised patients. He devised Rothwell’s Solution, a painkilling mouthwash still in use to help patients undergoing radiation and chemotherapy for mouth cancers.

The awards were presented by Dr. Patricia Rothwell, who was married to Dr. Rothwell for 16 years, and Dr. Mark Drangsholt, Chair of the UW Department of Oral Medicine and chair of the selection committee.

Jonathan An wins ADA student research award

Third-year student Jonathan An won the American Dental Association’s Student Clinician Scholar Award during the ADA’s annual session in New Orleans earlier this month.

Jonathan An (center) celebrates his award with faculty members Dr. Robert London and Dr. Sun Oh Chung.
Jonathan An (center) celebrates his award with faculty members Dr. Robert London and Dr. Sun Oh Chung.

An took top honors in the Basic Science Research competition with a project titled “Chemokine Epigenome Modification and Its Association With Bacteria in Periodontitis.” Dr. Sun Oh Chung of the Department of Oral Health Sciences was his mentor, and An’s co-authors included Dr. Robert  London and Dr. Sul Ki Hong of the Department of Periodontics and biostatistician Charles Spiekerman of Oral Health Sciences.

This marked the second  year in a row that a UW student won the Clinician Scholar Award, with Peter Yamamura (Class of 2014) winning last year’s competition. It also marked another major student research award for An, who in 2012 won the International Association for Dental Research’s Hatton Award.

“We are all incredibly proud of Jon and our outstanding faculty who represented our School of Dentistry,” said Dean Joel Berg. “Our School has a remarkable tradition of leadership in oral health research, and it’s tremendously satisfying to see a new generation of young scientists and clinicians coming forward to continue that tradition.”

About 70 student clinicians from 36 countries competed in this year’s ADA competition, which also includes a Clinical Science / Public Health Research category. The competition is rooted in the ADA’s Student Clinician Research Program (SCADA), which began in 1959 as a joint venture between the ADA and Dentsply International, a leading maker of dental and other health-care products. Now more than 5,000 students participate in SCADA annually.

Student Clinician Scholar Award winners receive $750 and a travel award to  present their research at the annual Thomas Hinman Dental Meeting, which next takes place March 27-29 in Atlanta.

“The quality and breadth of the science presented at this year’s competition was truly outstanding,” said  Dr. Terri Dolan, vice president and chief clinical officer for Dentsply International. “I am so proud of our student clinicians from around the globe, and we wish them continued success as our future leaders in dentistry.”