UW School of Dentistry

DENTPC 523

Dental Curriculum Threads

Dental Materials Science 1

Course Director: Kwok-Hung (Albert) Chung
Credits: 1
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course teaches first-year dental students to apply their college knowledge of chemistry, physics, and biology to the basic science of materials used in dentistry. Students will learn compositions, properties, and manipulation techniques of biomaterials used in dental applications.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the relationship between basic science, applied techniques, and evidence-based clinical dentistry.
2. Discuss the mechanical properties and testing of materials used in dentistry.
3. Discuss the physical properties of materials that are important in dentistry.
4. Discuss the impact of polymerization reactions on polymeric materials used in dentistry.
5. Compare reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid materials used in dentistry.
6. Identify the components, properties, and functions of elastomeric impression materials.
7. Describe phase diagram application, metallic solidification, and micro-structural changes in heat treatments of metallic materials.
8. Identify the manufacturing methods and techniques of classic and modern materials used in dentistry, especially digital dentistry.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-03, C-06, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-14, C-15, C-19, C-20, C-21,
C-28, C-30, CE-05, CE-07

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTPC 565

Dental Curriculum Threads

Conversations on Dental Practice

Course Directors: Sandra Phillips & Rachel Greene
Credits: 1 per quarter/3 quarters
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn, Winter/1; Autumn/2

Course Overview

This course is the introductory component of the four-year practice management series. It provides a foundation for practice management and features a variety of dental industry professionals sharing their expertise in this area.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Discuss the elements of practice management.
2. Describe the annual continuing dental education requirements for dentists and the rationale for ongoing training.
3. Compare the various types of dental benefit plans.
4. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various practice ownership models.
5. Analyze the components of an effective personal financial plan.

UWSOD Competencies:C-02, C-06, C-07, C-08, C-09, C-14, C-28, CE-04

Date last updated: 2021-09-14

DENTFN 522

Dental Curriculum Threads

Foundations of Dental Medicine 2

Course Director: Stuart Taylor and Ashland Doomes
Credits: 2
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course is a continuation of DENTFN 512. It further develops clinical skills forming the basis of patient-centered communication and the development of a diagnosis and care plan. These skills include developing rapport, eliciting problem and medical histories, assessing the impact of illness, performing a physical examination, forming a problem list, and documenting and communicating with the care team. Students learn the practice of professional reflection. This quarter will focus on case simulations that require utilization of newly acquired skills.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Explain how to obtain a comprehensive medical, dental, and behavioral history.
2. Discuss patient-centered communication skills for eliciting and exchanging information, identifying health priorities, and making decisions about treatment.
3. Identify social and cultural contributors to individual patients’ health and health behaviors.
4. Discuss how to adapt the interview to the clinical setting and to patients’ needs across the life cycle with a focus on geriatric and adolescent patients.
5. Describe the importance and techniques of communicating effectively with patients in a culturally sensitive manner with recognition of the impact of implicit biases.
6. Explain the need for eliciting an accurate substance-use history during a dental examination.
7. Discuss how to assess the structural and functional status of the head, neck, craniofacial, oral, and oropharyngeal structures, and the periodontium and dentition of patients.
8. Describe the steps in an oral cancer screening examination.
9. Describe the steps in a temporomandibular dysfunction screening.
10. Review how to document the patient’s history and exam, including the problem list and problem statement, in a standard and organized manner.
11. Develop a practice of professional reflection.
12. Explain how to deliver bad news in a clinical setting.
13. Apply the principles of ethics to the analysis of select cases of patient-dentist interactions.
14. Discuss how to communicate appropriately–with other clinicians and the patient–the specific problems and issues that require referral to a medical, behavioral, or dental specialist.
15. Explain the side effects and impact on dental care and oral health of the top thirty prescribed medications in the US.
16. Conduct a critical review of an evidence-based scientific publication that supports a clinical question.
17. Describe concepts related to health inequities for people from marginalized groups.
18. Apply principles of cultural humility to health care.

UWSOD Competencies:C-01, C-02, C-03, C-04, C-05, C-06, C-08, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14,
C-15, C-16, C-17, C-18, C-23, C-24, C-25, C-26, C-28, C-29, C-30, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06, CE-07

Date last updated: 2022-01-05

DENTPC 520

Dental Curriculum Threads

Dental Occlusion

Course Director: James Newman
Credits: 3
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

In this lecture and laboratory course, first-year dental students learn how to recognize and develop an optimal occlusion and proper tooth anatomy. This course expands upon the knowledge and manual skills that the students learned in DENTPC 510. Waxing techniques are used to teach students the development of a proper occlusion. Students will learn about principles of anatomy, mandibular movement, occlusion, etiologies of occlusal traumatism, principles in conjunction with techniques of occlusal adjustment, and bite splint therapy.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Correctly program a semi-adjustable articulator.
2. Develop proper anatomical form in teeth in maximum intercuspation and excursive movements.
3. Discuss the various occlusal schemes and the importance of centric relation and maximum intercuspation.
4. Describe the relationship of occlusal morphology to mandibular movements and how variations in mandibular movements affect occlusal form.
5. Discuss the determinants of occlusion using the proper terminology, and how variations of these determinants modify occlusal pathways.
6. Apply basic dental laboratory procedures.
7. Demonstrate the use of three-dimensional printed casts.
8. Explain what parameters are important for a clinically acceptable restoration.
9. Discuss the signs, symptoms, and etiology of occlusal traumatism.
10. Demonstrate the process of an occlusal adjustment.
11. Describe the role and function in specific mandibular movement of each of the muscles of mastication.
12. Evaluate temporomandibular disorders.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-10, C-12, C-15, C-16, C-19, C-20, C-21, C-22, C-24, C-29,
CE-02, CE-05

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTFN 523

Dental Curriculum Threads

Oral Histology & Embryology 1

Course Director: Tracy Popowics
Credits: 3
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

Students learn about the development, microscopic and submicroscopic structure, and functional aspects of hard and soft oral tissues. They gain an understanding of the embryonic development of head and neck, morphodifferentiation of facial and oral structures, relationships between development and structure, and structure and function in the histology or ultrastructure of oral tissues. This knowledge is foundational to a deep understanding of human disease.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the biological principles and details of the development, structure, and function of oral tissues.
2. Describe the normal structures of the oral tissues in preparation for courses in oral pathology and oral medicine.
3. Explain the basis for rational therapy through the application of basic science principles in the diagnosis and treatment of clinical problems.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, CE-02

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTFN 521

Dental Curriculum Threads

Introduction to Dental Public Health

Course Director: Donald Chi
Credits: 2
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course guides students through the process of developing critical thinking skills and addressing public health problems in dentistry. Students will critically evaluate a real-world dental public health case involving behavioral, social, ethical, and cultural elements; work collaboratively with group members to identify resources and gather information to develop a comprehensive understanding of the problem; develop hypotheses regarding the nature and complexity of the problem; prioritize goals and objectives relevant to the problem; and develop a feasible, evidence-based solution. The course will culminate in a final in-class group presentation.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Assess dental public health principles and problems in the United States and Washington state, including how oral health problems affect vulnerable subgroups and communities.
2. Analyze public health problems with dental, medical, behavioral, social, ethical, cultural, and community aspects.
3. Formulate a plan for seeking information on various aspects of a public health problem, consistent with good clinical practice and being a continual learner.
4. Articulate alternative points of view about a public health problem involving dentistry.
5. Evaluate different models of oral health care financing, management, and delivery.
6. Apply the principles of behavioral and social science that pertain to population-centered oral health care to the promotion, improvement, and maintenance of population oral health.
7. Demonstrate basic information search skills to help analyze public health problems.
8. Coherently and professionally articulate creative and feasible solutions to a dental public health problem.
9. Recognize the role of lifelong learning and self-assessment in maintaining clinical and professional skills.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-03, C-04, C-08, C-10, C-11, C-15, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTFN 520

Dental Curriculum Threads

Cardiac, Pulmonary, and Renal Diseases

Course Director: Bruce Silverstein
Credits: 8
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course will give students an integrated understanding of the key supply chain and waste management systems of the body. Students will follow how oxygen moves from the environment to the tissues, and how waste products of metabolism follow the opposite path, examining the coordinated roles of the lungs, heart, and kidneys in the control and regulation of these processes and the maintenance of homeostasis. Students will consider physiology and disease processes at the level of the organ system, with a focus on the physiology and pathophysiology of the lungs, heart, and kidneys. Because the lungs, heart, and kidneys interact with all the other major organ systems of the body and are responsible for delivering the substrate for and/or eliminating the waste products of their metabolic processes, understanding these systems is key to understanding human health and disease for the practice of general dentistry.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the external and internal morphology of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and the aorta and its major branch vessels.
2. Use anatomical specimens, medical imaging, and living adults to explain key anatomical relationships between the heart, kidneys, lungs, major blood vessels, and the structures and landmarks that surround them.
3. Describe the normal physiology of the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems.
4. Delineate the role of the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems in maintaining homeostasis including sodium and water regulation, electrolyte balance, and acid-base balance.
5. Identify connections between pathophysiologic and histopathologic abnormalities and the major disease processes affecting the heart, kidneys, lungs, and vascular system.
6. Interpret clinical, laboratory, radiographic, and histopathologic data to identify the major disease processes affecting the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems.
7. Identify the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic features, prevention, treatment and prognosis of major diseases and conditions of the cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems, including implications for the practice of dental medicine.
8. Outline a treatment approach, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic measures, for the major disease processes affecting the heart, lungs, kidneys, and vascular system.
9. Relate the mechanism of action for major classes of drugs to the pathophysiology of the major diseases of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and blood vessels.
10. Interpret clinical and other diagnostic information, recognizing the side effects and primary toxicities of the major classes of drugs used to treat diseases of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and blood vessels.
11. Recognize a cardiac emergency in a dental patient.
12. Describe how cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases affect the oral cavity and the provision of dental care.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-17, C-28, C-31, CE-02, CE03, CE-06, CE-07

Date last updated: 2021-12-31