UW School of Dentistry

DENTFN 501

Dental Curriculum Threads

Head and Neck Anatomy for Dental Students

Course Director: Katherine Rafferty
Credits: 3
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 1

Course Overview

This course provides an overview of head-and-neck anatomy geared toward dental students. Through short video lectures and virtual lab assignments, students will learn the structures of the head-and neck region and the relationship of this part of the body with the organization of the body systems. Through interactions with faculty and each other, students will learn to use correct anatomical language necessary to communicate with patients and other professionals.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Identify the gross anatomic structures found within different anatomical regions of the head
and neck.
2. Explain the anatomical systems as they apply to the head-and-neck region and relate to the
rest of the body.
3. Apply head-and-neck anatomical structures to a clinical situation.
4. Practice using the appropriate anatomical language necessary to communicate with colleagues
and other health care professionals.
5. Demonstrate the 3-dimensional spatial relationships between the anatomical structures in the
head-and-neck region.

UWSOD Competencies: C-03, C-08, CE-02

Date last updated: 2022-02-17

DENTFN 562

Dental Curriculum Threads

Foundations of Dental Medicine 3

Course Director: Kimberly Espinoza
Credits: 2
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 2

Course Overview

This course is a continuation of Foundations of Dental Medicine 1 and 2, focusing on several core skills necessary in dentistry: patient interviewing, head-and-neck exams, care of people with disabilities, and care of diverse populations. Interviewing topics include difficult interviewing, motivational interviewing, and communication with patients who have communication disorders. Disability topics include biopsychosocial profiles, care-facilitation techniques, and case-based scenarios. Beyond disability, topics related to diversity include religion and health care, prison health and intersectionality, and indigenous health. Finally, this course offers clinical experience with head-and neck exams.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Discuss classifications of human function, disability and health using a biopsychosocial framework (WHO ICF).
2. Assess the dental implications and potential facilitation techniques for patients with developmental disabilities and mental health conditions.
3. Outline the appropriate consent process when providing care for people with communication and cognitive or sensory impairments.
4. Describe concepts related to diversity, equity, and justice, including religion and health care, prison health and intersectionality, and indigenous health.
5. Demonstrate advanced interviewing techniques, including motivational interviewing and conducting “the difficult interview.”
6. Identify appropriate methods of communication for people with cognitive, sensory, and/or other communication impairments.
7. Use principles of metacognition to self-assess in major course areas: disability, cultural humility, and communication.
8. Assess the structural and functional status of the head, neck, craniofacial, oral, and oropharyngeal structures, and the periodontium and dentition of patients.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-03, C-04, C-05, C-06, C-09, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-16,
C-18, C-24, C-29, C-30, C-31, CE-02, CE-06

Date last updated: 2021-09-07

 

 

DENTFN 561

Dental Curriculum Threads

Lifecycle

Course Director: Elizabeth Garcia
Credits: 4
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 2

Course Overview

This course covers biomedical foundational information about the human lifespan from conception until death. Students will learn biological processes governing normal human development, reproduction, and aging, as well as common disease processes and pathology. Dental practice relevancy will be emphasized when applicable.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Summarize the physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy.
2. Compare general physiology principles, common pathologies, and common pharmacologic interventions to the physiological changes of pregnancy.
3. Identify the normal anatomy and physiology of the reproductive systems.
4. Generate an overview of the complex hormonal and anatomical systems which allow for human reproduction.
5. Create an overview of human reproduction from gamete to embryo, as well as an overview of the pregnancy process.
6. Characterize normal embryonic, fetal, and childhood growth and development as well as
reproductive maturity, aging, and end-of-life processes and common deviations that can occur
in this typical lifecycle.
7. Discuss common pathologies of the reproductive systems.
8. Describe the natural processes of aging, death, and dying, from the health practitioners’ viewpoint.
9. Reflect on the relationship of dental management within the arc of the human lifecycle

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-03, C-04, C-05, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-17,
C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2021-11-04

DENTFN 560

Dental Curriculum Threads

Mind, Brain, and Behavior

Course Director: Elizabeth Garcia & Malveeka Sharma
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 2

Course Overview

Students will learn the structure and function of the human nervous system and its observable behavior ranging from reflexes to cognitive and social behavior. Learning is integrated in lecture, small groups, laboratory settings, and in directed self-learning formats. This is a foundational course that is required for all second-year dental students.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the normal development, structure, and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems at both macroscopic and microscopic levels from a systems-level perspective.
2. Apply criteria for major psychiatric diagnoses as defined in DSM-V to discussions of clinical dental care.
3. Apply knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical findings, risk factors, and differential diagnoses of neurological diseases and disorders to discussions of clinical dental care.
4. Describe the major pathologies of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-04, C-05, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-17, C-18, C-30,
C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2022-02-17

DENTFN 533

Dental Curriculum Threads

Oral Histology & Embryology 2

Course Director: Tracy Popowics (Seattle) & Judd Case (RIDE Spokane)
Credits: 3
Quarters/Yr of Program: Spring/1

Course Overview

In this second course in oral histology and embryology, dental students continue to study the development, microscopic and submicroscopic structure, and functional aspects of hard and soft oral tissues. Included are the embryonic development of the head and neck; morphodifferentiation of face and oral structures; and relationships between development and structure, and structure and function in the histology or ultrastructure of oral tissues. This knowledge is foundational to a deep understanding of human disease.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the biological principles and details of the development, structure, and function of oral tissues.
2. Describe the normal structures of the oral tissues in preparation for courses in oral pathology and oral medicine
3. Explain the basis for rational therapy through the application of basic science principles in the diagnosis and treatment of clinical problems.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, CE-02, CE-03

Date last updated: 2022-03-29

DENTFN 531

Dental Curriculum Threads

Energetics and Homeostasis

Course Director: Bruce Silverstein
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Spring / 1

Course Overview

This course covers energy metabolism, nutrition, obesity, diabetes, gastrointestinal/liver physiology, and endocrinology. Topics include the physiology and pathology of digestion and hepatic function, clinical nutrition, endocrine integration of metabolism, and clinically important endocrine pathophysiology. It also covers relevant anatomy, histology, and pharmacology of endocrine and gastrointestinal systems.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the normal physiologic functions of the major endocrine and gastrointestinal organs.
2. Describe the hormonal feedback mechanisms of the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems that result in normal function.
3. Relate altered hormonal feedback mechanisms to disease processes in the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems.
4. Describe the pathologic processes that lead to disease in the endocrine and gastrointestinal organ systems.
5. Describe the etiology of the major diseases that affect the gastrointestinal tract, the liver, and the endocrine system.
6. Describe the clinical manifestations of the major diseases that affect the gastrointestinal tract, the liver, and the endocrine system.
7. Determine the best (e.g., most accurate, safest, or least expensive) method of diagnosing endocrine and gastrointestinal diseases.
8. Determine the best (e.g., most accurate, safest, or least expensive) method of treating specific endocrine and gastrointestinal diseases.
9. Select appropriate medications based on their mechanism of action for the treatment of the major diseases affecting the gastrointestinal and endocrine systems.
10. Relate knowledge of the cellular structures of the tissues and organs to their normal function in the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems.
11. Relate basic concepts of nutrition to the maintenance of health and development of disease states.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-17, C-18, C-26, C-28, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06, CE-07

Date last updated: 2022-03-29

 

DENTFN 530

Dental Curriculum Threads

Blood and Cancer

Course Director: David Dean
Credits: 3
Quarters/Yr of Program: Spring / 1

Course Overview

This overview of hematology and oncology addresses the biology of bone marrow and blood and introduces the multidisciplinary field of cancer medicine. Specific cancer subtypes provide illustrative examples of the impact of molecular biology and environmental risk factors on the development and treatment of malignancy. There will be an emphasis on head and neck cancer and the oral complications of cancer therapy.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Differentiate the properties of hematopoietic stem cells and mature blood cells.
2. Outline the process of hematopoiesis from hematopoietic stem cell through terminal differentiation in the lymphoid and myeloid lineages.
3. Compare and contrast the morphology, function, and relative life span of erythrocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and thrombocytes.
4. Summarize the clinical features of anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, aplastic anemia, thalassemia, and sickle cell anemia and the diagnostic tests in their assessment.
5. Describe the functional components of the immune system and the clinical impacts of immunosuppression.
6. Explain the clinical significance of each item in a CBC with differential.
7. Rank the relative proportion of white blood cell subtypes under normal circumstances.
8. Create a perioperative treatment plan for a patient with anemia.
9. Explain the goals of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, head-and-neck cancer surgery, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and anti-osteoclastic therapy in the treatment of cancer.
10. Create a perioperative treatment plan for a patient with neutropenia.
11. Outline the steps in hemostasis.
12. Summarize the clinical features of abnormal hemostasis and thrombosis.
13. Create a perioperative plan for a patient with elevated risk for bleeding.
14. Compare and contrast the characteristics of normal cells with those in benign neoplasia, malignancy, and metastasis.
15. Describe the histologic features of normal epithelium, benign epithelial hyperplasia, epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and squamous cell carcinoma.
16. Summarize the modifiable and non-modifiable factors influencing cancer risk (including risk factors for oral and oropharyngeal cancer).
17. Describe the clinical characteristics of the most common solid cancers in the United States and the screening tools used to identify them.
18. Explain the functional purpose of cancer chemotherapy and the biological principles on which chemotherapies are based.
19. Describe the clinical characteristics and relative potential for malignant transformation for leukoplakia, erythroplakia, proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, and oral lichen planus.
20. Compare the epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical characteristics of tobacco-induced oral squamous cell carcinoma and HPV-induced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
21. Identify signs and symptoms suspicious for cancer based on patient history and clinical examination.
22. Design a diagnostic plan when signs or symptoms suspicious for cancer are identified.
23. Compare and contrast treatment modalities for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma based on TNM staging and depth of invasion.
24. Describe the anticipated treatment course, adverse effects, and potential oral complications of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, head-and-neck cancer surgery, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and anti-osteoclastic therapy in the treatment of cancer.
25. Create a treatment plan to minimize, mitigate, or manage the potential oral complications of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, head-and-neck cancer surgery, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and anti-osteoclastic therapy.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-10, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-17, C-18, C-24, C-28, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2022-03-30

DENTFN 522

Dental Curriculum Threads

Foundations of Dental Medicine 2

Course Director: Stuart Taylor and Ashland Doomes
Credits: 2
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course is a continuation of DENTFN 512. It further develops clinical skills forming the basis of patient-centered communication and the development of a diagnosis and care plan. These skills include developing rapport, eliciting problem and medical histories, assessing the impact of illness, performing a physical examination, forming a problem list, and documenting and communicating with the care team. Students learn the practice of professional reflection. This quarter will focus on case simulations that require utilization of newly acquired skills.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Explain how to obtain a comprehensive medical, dental, and behavioral history.
2. Discuss patient-centered communication skills for eliciting and exchanging information, identifying health priorities, and making decisions about treatment.
3. Identify social and cultural contributors to individual patients’ health and health behaviors.
4. Discuss how to adapt the interview to the clinical setting and to patients’ needs across the life cycle with a focus on geriatric and adolescent patients.
5. Describe the importance and techniques of communicating effectively with patients in a culturally sensitive manner with recognition of the impact of implicit biases.
6. Explain the need for eliciting an accurate substance-use history during a dental examination.
7. Discuss how to assess the structural and functional status of the head, neck, craniofacial, oral, and oropharyngeal structures, and the periodontium and dentition of patients.
8. Describe the steps in an oral cancer screening examination.
9. Describe the steps in a temporomandibular dysfunction screening.
10. Review how to document the patient’s history and exam, including the problem list and problem statement, in a standard and organized manner.
11. Develop a practice of professional reflection.
12. Explain how to deliver bad news in a clinical setting.
13. Apply the principles of ethics to the analysis of select cases of patient-dentist interactions.
14. Discuss how to communicate appropriately–with other clinicians and the patient–the specific problems and issues that require referral to a medical, behavioral, or dental specialist.
15. Explain the side effects and impact on dental care and oral health of the top thirty prescribed medications in the US.
16. Conduct a critical review of an evidence-based scientific publication that supports a clinical question.
17. Describe concepts related to health inequities for people from marginalized groups.
18. Apply principles of cultural humility to health care.

UWSOD Competencies:C-01, C-02, C-03, C-04, C-05, C-06, C-08, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14,
C-15, C-16, C-17, C-18, C-23, C-24, C-25, C-26, C-28, C-29, C-30, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06, CE-07

Date last updated: 2022-01-05

DENTFN 523

Dental Curriculum Threads

Oral Histology & Embryology 1

Course Director: Tracy Popowics
Credits: 3
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

Students learn about the development, microscopic and submicroscopic structure, and functional aspects of hard and soft oral tissues. They gain an understanding of the embryonic development of head and neck, morphodifferentiation of facial and oral structures, relationships between development and structure, and structure and function in the histology or ultrastructure of oral tissues. This knowledge is foundational to a deep understanding of human disease.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the biological principles and details of the development, structure, and function of oral tissues.
2. Describe the normal structures of the oral tissues in preparation for courses in oral pathology and oral medicine.
3. Explain the basis for rational therapy through the application of basic science principles in the diagnosis and treatment of clinical problems.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, CE-02

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTFN 521

Dental Curriculum Threads

Introduction to Dental Public Health

Course Director: Donald Chi
Credits: 2
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course guides students through the process of developing critical thinking skills and addressing public health problems in dentistry. Students will critically evaluate a real-world dental public health case involving behavioral, social, ethical, and cultural elements; work collaboratively with group members to identify resources and gather information to develop a comprehensive understanding of the problem; develop hypotheses regarding the nature and complexity of the problem; prioritize goals and objectives relevant to the problem; and develop a feasible, evidence-based solution. The course will culminate in a final in-class group presentation.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Assess dental public health principles and problems in the United States and Washington state, including how oral health problems affect vulnerable subgroups and communities.
2. Analyze public health problems with dental, medical, behavioral, social, ethical, cultural, and community aspects.
3. Formulate a plan for seeking information on various aspects of a public health problem, consistent with good clinical practice and being a continual learner.
4. Articulate alternative points of view about a public health problem involving dentistry.
5. Evaluate different models of oral health care financing, management, and delivery.
6. Apply the principles of behavioral and social science that pertain to population-centered oral health care to the promotion, improvement, and maintenance of population oral health.
7. Demonstrate basic information search skills to help analyze public health problems.
8. Coherently and professionally articulate creative and feasible solutions to a dental public health problem.
9. Recognize the role of lifelong learning and self-assessment in maintaining clinical and professional skills.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-03, C-04, C-08, C-10, C-11, C-15, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTFN 520

Dental Curriculum Threads

Cardiac, Pulmonary, and Renal Diseases

Course Director: Bruce Silverstein
Credits: 8
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course will give students an integrated understanding of the key supply chain and waste management systems of the body. Students will follow how oxygen moves from the environment to the tissues, and how waste products of metabolism follow the opposite path, examining the coordinated roles of the lungs, heart, and kidneys in the control and regulation of these processes and the maintenance of homeostasis. Students will consider physiology and disease processes at the level of the organ system, with a focus on the physiology and pathophysiology of the lungs, heart, and kidneys. Because the lungs, heart, and kidneys interact with all the other major organ systems of the body and are responsible for delivering the substrate for and/or eliminating the waste products of their metabolic processes, understanding these systems is key to understanding human health and disease for the practice of general dentistry.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the external and internal morphology of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and the aorta and its major branch vessels.
2. Use anatomical specimens, medical imaging, and living adults to explain key anatomical relationships between the heart, kidneys, lungs, major blood vessels, and the structures and landmarks that surround them.
3. Describe the normal physiology of the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems.
4. Delineate the role of the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems in maintaining homeostasis including sodium and water regulation, electrolyte balance, and acid-base balance.
5. Identify connections between pathophysiologic and histopathologic abnormalities and the major disease processes affecting the heart, kidneys, lungs, and vascular system.
6. Interpret clinical, laboratory, radiographic, and histopathologic data to identify the major disease processes affecting the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems.
7. Identify the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic features, prevention, treatment and prognosis of major diseases and conditions of the cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems, including implications for the practice of dental medicine.
8. Outline a treatment approach, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic measures, for the major disease processes affecting the heart, lungs, kidneys, and vascular system.
9. Relate the mechanism of action for major classes of drugs to the pathophysiology of the major diseases of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and blood vessels.
10. Interpret clinical and other diagnostic information, recognizing the side effects and primary toxicities of the major classes of drugs used to treat diseases of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and blood vessels.
11. Recognize a cardiac emergency in a dental patient.
12. Describe how cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases affect the oral cavity and the provision of dental care.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-17, C-28, C-31, CE-02, CE03, CE-06, CE-07

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTFN 513

Dental Curriculum Threads

Oral Microbiology

Course Director: Jeffrey McLean
Credits: 2
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 1

Course Overview

Caries and periodontitis are the most common microbial-based diseases that dentists treat every day; therefore, future dentists must have a strong understanding of the basic microbiology behind the etiology of these diseases. This lecture course will cover many aspects of oral microbiology including oral ecology, the human microbiome, and the relationship of bacteria to human health and disease.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Discuss the basic scientific rationale for the practice of microbiology in dentistry regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of oral diseases.
2. Explain the basic knowledge of immune responses, oral bacterial virulence factors, and bacterial immune evasion.
3. Describe the principles of bacterial genetic variation and the types of techniques used to assess taxonomic/genomic diversity and their applications in dentistry.
4. Describe innate and adaptive immunity in the oral cavity.
5. Discuss basic knowledge of immune responses, oral bacterial virulence factors, and immune evasion.
6. Describe the bacteriological etiology and pathogenic mechanisms involved in the two major plaque-related diseases, caries, and periodontal disease.
7. Describe the principles of clinical asepsis.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-03

Date last updated: 2021-10-18

DENTFN 512

Dental Curriculum Threads

Foundations of Dental Medicine

Course Director: Ashland Doomes and Stuart Taylor
Credits: 2
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 1

Course Overview

This course promotes the development of clinical skills that form the basis of patientcentered communication, history-taking and physical assessment, and medical record documentation. It includes a brief introduction to telehealth dentistry. Students learn interactively through classroom lecture sessions, small group discussions and case activities, physical examination practice sessions, and clinical observations. They also develop culturallyappropriate basic skills through an elearning program.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Obtain a comprehensive medical/dental/behavioral history.
2. Explain patient-centered communication skills for eliciting and exchanging information, identifying health priorities, and making decisions about treatment.
3. Identify social and cultural contributors to individual patients’ health and health behaviors.
4. Adapt the interview to the clinical setting and to patients’ needs across the life cycle, with a focus on geriatric and adolescent patients.
5. Describe the importance and techniques of communicating effectively with patients in a culturally-sensitive manner with recognition of the impact of implicit biases.
6. Explain the need for eliciting an accurate substance-use history during a dental examination.
7. Assess the structural and functional status of the head, neck, craniofacial, oral, oropharyngeal structures, and the periodontium and dentition of patients.
8. Perform an oral cancer screening examination.
9. Perform a temporomandibular dysfunction screening.
10. Accurately and completely document a patient’s history and exam—including the problem list—in a standard and organized manner.
11. Develop an accurate, complete, and well-organized oral case presentation for a new or continuing patient, adapting the presentation to the clinical setting.
12. Develop a practice of professional reflection.
13. Utilize principles of ethics to analyze selected cases of patient-dentist interaction.
14. Explain the side effects and impact on dental care and oral health of the top thirty-two prescribed medications in the U.S.
15. Describe concepts related to health inequities for people from marginalized groups.
16. Apply principles of cultural humility to health care.

UWSOD Competencies: C01, C02, C03, C04, C05, C06, C09, C10, C11, C12, C13, C14, C15, C- 16, C-17, C-18, C-23, C-24, C-26, C-29, C-30, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-05, CE06, CE07

Date last updated: 2021-09-08

DENTFN 511

Dental Curriculum Threads

Invaders and Defenders

Course Director: Whasun “Sun” Oh Chung
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn/ 1

Course Overview

Students will analyze critical concepts of microbiology and immunology in both health and disease using content-specific language. By the completion of this course, they will be able to interpret the manifestations of host-immune and pathogen responses in common infections of global health that impact dentistry. Classes will include large group lectures and small group discussions of case-based studies.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Analyze common diagnostic results of infectious and immune-mediated diseases.
2. Analyze factors that contribute to the expanding impact of infectious diseases on
interdependent health communities locally and globally.
3. Apply evidence-based approaches to the management and prevention of infectious and
immune-mediated diseases.
4. Describe the characteristics of antimicrobials, their mechanisms of action, mechanisms of
resistance, and adverse effects including allergy.
5. Compare normal innate and adaptive immune mechanisms used to recognize, control, and
clear pathogens.
6. Apply the clinical features, cells, and soluble mediators of inflammation to an explanation of
beneficial and deleterious inflammatory responses.
7. Compare normal and abnormal immune mechanisms that mediate tolerance, autoimmunity,
and allergy.
8. Relate the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the lymphoid system to how cells and
proteins of the immune system traffic and interact in the lymphoid system to generate an
immune response.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-08, C-11, C-12, C-15, C-17, C-24, C-29, C-30, C-31

Date last updated: 2021-08-27

DENTFN 510

Dental Curriculum Threads

Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease

Course Director: Whasun “Sun” Oh Chung
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 1

Course Overview

This course covers a broad range of topics in molecular and cellular biology, including cell basics, enzymes, protein/carbohydrate/lipid metabolism, cancer, neurobiology, pharmacology, and histology. Students will learn how various diseases are caused and regulated at molecular and cellular levels. Successful completion of this course will help prepare students to assess what cellular changes are responsible for diseases and how to intervene in diseases that are of importance in dentistry.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the “central dogma” of molecular biology and the informational roles DNA, RNA, and
protein play in disease development.
2. Illustrate carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism and how each metabolic regulation leads
to certain physiological outcomes.
3. Explain the functions of DNA methylation, covalent histone modifications and non-coding RNAs
in producing epigenetic effects, and outcomes of specific epigenetic changes on gene
expression.
4. Differentiate how defects in DNA repair pathways lead to specific syndromes and how these
defects could be remedied.
5. Assess various aspects of cancer pathophysiology and how each leads to a projected outcome.
6. Compare drug/receptor interactions and the dose/response/therapeutic window.
7. Describe the histological types, structural characteristics, and functions of epithelia.
8. Define the anatomic (central and peripheral) and functional (somatic and autonomic) divisions
of the nervous system.
9. Analyze the cell injury, inflammation, and repair processes and how each contributes to
homeostasis in health and disease.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-08, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-16, C-17, C-23, C-24, C25, C-26, C-30, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2022-02-17

DENTFN 500

Dental Curriculum Threads

Early Clinical Immersion

Course Director: Diane Daubert
Credits: 6
Quarters/Yr of Program: Summer / 1

Course Overview

This course will introduce incoming students to clinical dentistry. They will learn from lectures and simulated activities to gather and manage fundamental clinical data and information necessary for all dental clinic procedures. They will also critically appraise scientific literature derived from dental research and investigate the dental specialties. Students will study basic tooth morphology using waxing techniques.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Explain aseptic procedures in a clinical setting.
2. Apply correct dental anatomy terminology to a simulated dental examination and periodontal exam.
3. Apply the components of a dental record and the ethical and medical/legal implications of proper treatment notes to a written treatment note using the SOAP format.
4. Recognize how cultural differences impact communication with patients from diverse populations.
5. Illustrate how to take a medical history and input this information into a dental record.
6. Demonstrate a head-and-neck examination and a dental examination, applying relevant elements from head-and-neck anatomy.
7. Identify the training requirements and duties of each member of the dental healthcare team.
8. Assess the effectiveness of various oral hygiene techniques.
9. Describe various methods for the prevention of dental trauma.
10. Apply the elements of a healthy diet and the interaction between nutrition and oral health to nutritional self-assessment and dietary planning in patient simulations.
11. Identify various factors affecting caries risk including salivary flow and access to fluoride.
12. Describe career path options for dentists.
13. Act in a professional and ethical manner.
14. Identify signs of impairment or psychological stress in self or colleagues, the avenues for help, and the professional responsibilities for reporting.
15. Recreate basic tooth morphology through waxing techniques.

UWSOD Competencies: C01, C02, C04, C05, C06, C07, C08, C09, C10, C11, C12, C13, C15, C19, C20, C22, C30, CE02, CE06, CE07

Date last updated: 2022-02-17