UW School of Dentistry

DENTFN 561

Dental Curriculum Threads

Lifecycle

Course Director: Elizabeth Garcia
Credits: 4
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 2

Course Overview

This course covers biomedical foundational information about the human lifespan from conception until death. Students will learn biological processes governing normal human development, reproduction, and aging, as well as common disease processes and pathology. Dental practice relevancy will be emphasized when applicable.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Summarize the physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy.
2. Compare general physiology principles, common pathologies, and common pharmacologic interventions to the physiological changes of pregnancy.
3. Identify the normal anatomy and physiology of the reproductive systems.
4. Generate an overview of the complex hormonal and anatomical systems which allow for human reproduction.
5. Create an overview of human reproduction from gamete to embryo, as well as an overview of the pregnancy process.
6. Characterize normal embryonic, fetal, and childhood growth and development as well as
reproductive maturity, aging, and end-of-life processes and common deviations that can occur
in this typical lifecycle.
7. Discuss common pathologies of the reproductive systems.
8. Describe the natural processes of aging, death, and dying, from the health practitioners’ viewpoint.
9. Reflect on the relationship of dental management within the arc of the human lifecycle

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-02, C-03, C-04, C-05, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-17,
C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2021-11-04

DENTFN 560

Dental Curriculum Threads

Mind, Brain, and Behavior

Course Director: Elizabeth Garcia & Malveeka Sharma
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 2

Course Overview

Students will learn the structure and function of the human nervous system and its observable behavior ranging from reflexes to cognitive and social behavior. Learning is integrated in lecture, small groups, laboratory settings, and in directed self-learning formats. This is a foundational course that is required for all second-year dental students.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the normal development, structure, and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems at both macroscopic and microscopic levels from a systems-level perspective.
2. Apply criteria for major psychiatric diagnoses as defined in DSM-V to discussions of clinical dental care.
3. Apply knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical findings, risk factors, and differential diagnoses of neurological diseases and disorders to discussions of clinical dental care.
4. Describe the major pathologies of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-04, C-05, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-17, C-18, C-30,
C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2022-02-17

DENTFN 531

Dental Curriculum Threads

Energetics and Homeostasis

Course Director: Bruce Silverstein
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Spring / 1

Course Overview

This course covers energy metabolism, nutrition, obesity, diabetes, gastrointestinal/liver physiology, and endocrinology. Topics include the physiology and pathology of digestion and hepatic function, clinical nutrition, endocrine integration of metabolism, and clinically important endocrine pathophysiology. It also covers relevant anatomy, histology, and pharmacology of endocrine and gastrointestinal systems.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the normal physiologic functions of the major endocrine and gastrointestinal organs.
2. Describe the hormonal feedback mechanisms of the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems that result in normal function.
3. Relate altered hormonal feedback mechanisms to disease processes in the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems.
4. Describe the pathologic processes that lead to disease in the endocrine and gastrointestinal organ systems.
5. Describe the etiology of the major diseases that affect the gastrointestinal tract, the liver, and the endocrine system.
6. Describe the clinical manifestations of the major diseases that affect the gastrointestinal tract, the liver, and the endocrine system.
7. Determine the best (e.g., most accurate, safest, or least expensive) method of diagnosing endocrine and gastrointestinal diseases.
8. Determine the best (e.g., most accurate, safest, or least expensive) method of treating specific endocrine and gastrointestinal diseases.
9. Select appropriate medications based on their mechanism of action for the treatment of the major diseases affecting the gastrointestinal and endocrine systems.
10. Relate knowledge of the cellular structures of the tissues and organs to their normal function in the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems.
11. Relate basic concepts of nutrition to the maintenance of health and development of disease states.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-17, C-18, C-26, C-28, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06, CE-07

Date last updated: 2022-03-29

 

DENTFN 530

Dental Curriculum Threads

Blood and Cancer

Course Director: David Dean
Credits: 3
Quarters/Yr of Program: Spring / 1

Course Overview

This overview of hematology and oncology addresses the biology of bone marrow and blood and introduces the multidisciplinary field of cancer medicine. Specific cancer subtypes provide illustrative examples of the impact of molecular biology and environmental risk factors on the development and treatment of malignancy. There will be an emphasis on head and neck cancer and the oral complications of cancer therapy.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Differentiate the properties of hematopoietic stem cells and mature blood cells.
2. Outline the process of hematopoiesis from hematopoietic stem cell through terminal differentiation in the lymphoid and myeloid lineages.
3. Compare and contrast the morphology, function, and relative life span of erythrocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and thrombocytes.
4. Summarize the clinical features of anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, aplastic anemia, thalassemia, and sickle cell anemia and the diagnostic tests in their assessment.
5. Describe the functional components of the immune system and the clinical impacts of immunosuppression.
6. Explain the clinical significance of each item in a CBC with differential.
7. Rank the relative proportion of white blood cell subtypes under normal circumstances.
8. Create a perioperative treatment plan for a patient with anemia.
9. Explain the goals of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, head-and-neck cancer surgery, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and anti-osteoclastic therapy in the treatment of cancer.
10. Create a perioperative treatment plan for a patient with neutropenia.
11. Outline the steps in hemostasis.
12. Summarize the clinical features of abnormal hemostasis and thrombosis.
13. Create a perioperative plan for a patient with elevated risk for bleeding.
14. Compare and contrast the characteristics of normal cells with those in benign neoplasia, malignancy, and metastasis.
15. Describe the histologic features of normal epithelium, benign epithelial hyperplasia, epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and squamous cell carcinoma.
16. Summarize the modifiable and non-modifiable factors influencing cancer risk (including risk factors for oral and oropharyngeal cancer).
17. Describe the clinical characteristics of the most common solid cancers in the United States and the screening tools used to identify them.
18. Explain the functional purpose of cancer chemotherapy and the biological principles on which chemotherapies are based.
19. Describe the clinical characteristics and relative potential for malignant transformation for leukoplakia, erythroplakia, proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, and oral lichen planus.
20. Compare the epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical characteristics of tobacco-induced oral squamous cell carcinoma and HPV-induced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
21. Identify signs and symptoms suspicious for cancer based on patient history and clinical examination.
22. Design a diagnostic plan when signs or symptoms suspicious for cancer are identified.
23. Compare and contrast treatment modalities for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma based on TNM staging and depth of invasion.
24. Describe the anticipated treatment course, adverse effects, and potential oral complications of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, head-and-neck cancer surgery, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and anti-osteoclastic therapy in the treatment of cancer.
25. Create a treatment plan to minimize, mitigate, or manage the potential oral complications of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, head-and-neck cancer surgery, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and anti-osteoclastic therapy.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-10, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-17, C-18, C-24, C-28, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2022-03-30

DENTFN 520

Dental Curriculum Threads

Cardiac, Pulmonary, and Renal Diseases

Course Director: Bruce Silverstein
Credits: 8
Quarters/Yr of Program: Winter / 1

Course Overview

This course will give students an integrated understanding of the key supply chain and waste management systems of the body. Students will follow how oxygen moves from the environment to the tissues, and how waste products of metabolism follow the opposite path, examining the coordinated roles of the lungs, heart, and kidneys in the control and regulation of these processes and the maintenance of homeostasis. Students will consider physiology and disease processes at the level of the organ system, with a focus on the physiology and pathophysiology of the lungs, heart, and kidneys. Because the lungs, heart, and kidneys interact with all the other major organ systems of the body and are responsible for delivering the substrate for and/or eliminating the waste products of their metabolic processes, understanding these systems is key to understanding human health and disease for the practice of general dentistry.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the external and internal morphology of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and the aorta and its major branch vessels.
2. Use anatomical specimens, medical imaging, and living adults to explain key anatomical relationships between the heart, kidneys, lungs, major blood vessels, and the structures and landmarks that surround them.
3. Describe the normal physiology of the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems.
4. Delineate the role of the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems in maintaining homeostasis including sodium and water regulation, electrolyte balance, and acid-base balance.
5. Identify connections between pathophysiologic and histopathologic abnormalities and the major disease processes affecting the heart, kidneys, lungs, and vascular system.
6. Interpret clinical, laboratory, radiographic, and histopathologic data to identify the major disease processes affecting the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems.
7. Identify the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic features, prevention, treatment and prognosis of major diseases and conditions of the cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems, including implications for the practice of dental medicine.
8. Outline a treatment approach, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic measures, for the major disease processes affecting the heart, lungs, kidneys, and vascular system.
9. Relate the mechanism of action for major classes of drugs to the pathophysiology of the major diseases of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and blood vessels.
10. Interpret clinical and other diagnostic information, recognizing the side effects and primary toxicities of the major classes of drugs used to treat diseases of the heart, kidneys, lungs, and blood vessels.
11. Recognize a cardiac emergency in a dental patient.
12. Describe how cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases affect the oral cavity and the provision of dental care.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-09, C-10, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-17, C-28, C-31, CE-02, CE03, CE-06, CE-07

Date last updated: 2021-12-31

DENTFN 511

Dental Curriculum Threads

Invaders and Defenders

Course Director: Whasun “Sun” Oh Chung
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn/ 1

Course Overview

Students will analyze critical concepts of microbiology and immunology in both health and disease using content-specific language. By the completion of this course, they will be able to interpret the manifestations of host-immune and pathogen responses in common infections of global health that impact dentistry. Classes will include large group lectures and small group discussions of case-based studies.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Analyze common diagnostic results of infectious and immune-mediated diseases.
2. Analyze factors that contribute to the expanding impact of infectious diseases on
interdependent health communities locally and globally.
3. Apply evidence-based approaches to the management and prevention of infectious and
immune-mediated diseases.
4. Describe the characteristics of antimicrobials, their mechanisms of action, mechanisms of
resistance, and adverse effects including allergy.
5. Compare normal innate and adaptive immune mechanisms used to recognize, control, and
clear pathogens.
6. Apply the clinical features, cells, and soluble mediators of inflammation to an explanation of
beneficial and deleterious inflammatory responses.
7. Compare normal and abnormal immune mechanisms that mediate tolerance, autoimmunity,
and allergy.
8. Relate the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the lymphoid system to how cells and
proteins of the immune system traffic and interact in the lymphoid system to generate an
immune response.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-08, C-11, C-12, C-15, C-17, C-24, C-29, C-30, C-31

Date last updated: 2021-08-27

DENTFN 510

Dental Curriculum Threads

Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease

Course Director: Whasun “Sun” Oh Chung
Credits: 5
Quarters/Yr of Program: Autumn / 1

Course Overview

This course covers a broad range of topics in molecular and cellular biology, including cell basics, enzymes, protein/carbohydrate/lipid metabolism, cancer, neurobiology, pharmacology, and histology. Students will learn how various diseases are caused and regulated at molecular and cellular levels. Successful completion of this course will help prepare students to assess what cellular changes are responsible for diseases and how to intervene in diseases that are of importance in dentistry.

Learning Objectives

The student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

1. Describe the “central dogma” of molecular biology and the informational roles DNA, RNA, and
protein play in disease development.
2. Illustrate carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism and how each metabolic regulation leads
to certain physiological outcomes.
3. Explain the functions of DNA methylation, covalent histone modifications and non-coding RNAs
in producing epigenetic effects, and outcomes of specific epigenetic changes on gene
expression.
4. Differentiate how defects in DNA repair pathways lead to specific syndromes and how these
defects could be remedied.
5. Assess various aspects of cancer pathophysiology and how each leads to a projected outcome.
6. Compare drug/receptor interactions and the dose/response/therapeutic window.
7. Describe the histological types, structural characteristics, and functions of epithelia.
8. Define the anatomic (central and peripheral) and functional (somatic and autonomic) divisions
of the nervous system.
9. Analyze the cell injury, inflammation, and repair processes and how each contributes to
homeostasis in health and disease.

UWSOD Competencies: C-01, C-03, C-08, C-11, C-12, C-13, C-14, C-15, C-16, C-17, C-23, C-24, C25, C-26, C-30, C-31, CE-02, CE-03, CE-06

Date last updated: 2022-02-17