Management of the Fearful Dental Patient & Drugs, Death and Dentistry

Stanley F. Malamed, DDS

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This course is completely full. No walk-in registration will be available for Friday's course.

This course is offered in partnership with the Seattle King County Dental Society and the Washington Academy of General Dentistry.

In Washington State, this course will fulfill the 7 hours of CE required every 5 years for using nitrous oxide/oral conscious sedation, or can be applied towards the hours required to obtain a permit in Level Two moderate conscious sedation. (WAC 246-817-740 through 760)

Management of the Fearful Dental Patient

Fear of the dentist is one of our most common fears. Many patients have avoided seeking dental treatment because of these fears.

In this program, Dr. Malamed will review the more commonly employed management techniques for dental fear and anxiety, including the oral route of drug administration (e.g. triazolam [Halcion]); inhalation (N20-02); intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM) and intranasal (IN).

Techniques will be compared as to efficacy and safety, as well as their utility in the typical dental practice.

Drugs, Death and Dentistry

The incidence of serious morbidity or of death within the confines of the dental office is, happily, quite low. However, on occasion, such problems do occur. Oftentimes these problems are associated with the administration of drugs associated with dental treatment.

In this presentation Dr. Malamed will review actual cases, illustrating what went wrong, and what could have been done either to prevent the incident from occurring in the first place or, failing that, what should have been done to produce a better outcome.

Instructor

Stanley F. Malamed, a dentist anesthesiologist, graduated from the New York University College of Dentistry in 1969 and then completed a residency in anesthesiology at Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center in New York before serving for 2 years in the U.S. Army Dental Corps. In 1973, he joined the faculty of the University of Southern California School of Dentistry, where he is Emeritus Professor of Dentistry. Dr. Malamed is a Diplomate of the American Dental Board of Anesthesiology, as well as a recipient of the Heidebrink Award [1996] from the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology and the Horace Wells Award from the International Federation of Dental Anesthesia Societies. Dr. Malamed has authored more than 160 scientific papers and 17 chapters in various medical and dental journals and textbooks in the areas of physical evaluation, emergency medicine, local anesthesia, sedation and general anesthesia.

Course Logistics

DATE:
Friday, May 12, 2017

LOCATION:
Bellevue Westin Hotel – Lincoln Square
600 Bellevue Way NE
Bellevue, WA 98004

TARGET AUDIENCE:
This course is primarily designed for dentists; however, hygienists and assistants may also find the information useful.

REGISTER:
Register for this course through Seattle King County Dental Society – Limited seating available by phone at (206) 448-6620 where you can get one of the remaining 3 seats (as of Tuesday, 5pm) or be placed on the waiting list. No walk-in registration will be available for Friday’s course.

TIMES:
Registration and Continental Breakfast: 8:00am – 8:30am
Course: 8:30am – 4:30pm

TUITION – price includes lunch:
Early Bird – before May 5, 2017
$245/Dentist
$160/Retired Dentists, Dental Hygienists, Dental Assistants and Office Staff

After May 5, 2017
$270/Dentist
$185/Retired Dentists, Dental Hygienists, Dental Assistants and Office Staff

CREDITS:
7 hours


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The University of Washington is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.
ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

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The University of Washington is a member of the Association for Continuing Dental Education.

University of Washington designates this activity for 7 continuing education credits.