Clinic Overviews

University of Washington Medical Center

IV

The University of Washington Medical Center is a 450-bed hospital located in the Health Sciences Center on the University’s South Campus. Elective reconstructive surgery is the primary focus of treatment at this site. Temporomandibular joint, pathological, pre-prosthetic and dentoalveolar surgery comprise the bulk of the oral surgery operations performed at the UW Medical center. Each resident spends at least 6 months at this hospital.

Harborview Medical Center

Formerly King County Hospital, the 400-bed Harborview Medical Center (HMC) is now part of the University system and is the primary level one trauma center serving the greater Seattle area and the Pacific Northwest.  The Trauma Center, opened in February 1975, has the finest emergency trauma facilities in the region.  Each resident spends at least 9 months at HMC and trauma surgery comprises the majority of the oral and maxillofacial procedures performed.  The resident on call stays at the hospital, and while on call, is required to sleep in the residents’ quarters at the Harborview Medical Center.  In addition, the ambulatory anesthesia program for residents in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, under the direction of Dr. O. Ross Beirne, is based at Harborview Medical Center.

Children’s Hospital and Medical Center

Children's Hospital

Children’s Hospital is a 250-bed pediatric medical center serving the Northwest (including Alaska).  Each resident spends at least 6 months at this center.  The Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery service has recently been expanded, holds regular clinics, seeing and operating on in-patient pediatric patients with a variety of oral and maxillofacial problems.  Trainees are assigned to both the outpatient clinic and inpatient surgical service. 

Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System

The Seattle VA Medical Center is a 450-bed tertiary care hospital serving a geographic area which includes Washington, Idaho, Alaska and Oregon. A current service in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery was opened in October of 1996. Residents manage medically compromised patients with a variety of surgical problems including dentoalveolar, pre-prosthetic, implant, head and neck pathology.  Each resident spends at least three months at the VA Medical Center. 

Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical center, Portland, OR

Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center is a full-service 300-bed hospital in north Portland.  Legacy Good Samaritan is a dedicated community leader and a medical center of national acclaim.  Founded in 1875, it is a part of the Legacy Health System.  In 1989, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center and Healthlink joined forces to establish Legacy Health Systems.  It is a not-for-profit, tax-exempt corporation.  The medical center offers acute and critical
care, inpatient and outpatient treatment and a variety of specialty services.  Each resident spends 4-6 months at Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital.  The residents share call with the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery resident from Oregon Health Sciences University.  The scope of practice in general is head and neck surgery as well as oral and maxillofacial Surgery.  The resident receives experience in trauma in managing the full scope of facial trauma, management of the head and neck malignancies, and general head and neck surgery. 

Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA

Swedish was founded as a surgical hospital in 1910. Today, Swedish offers the largest, most comprehensive surgery program in the region, offering advanced resources and responsive, personalized care. The University of Washington Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Program rotates a resident to Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. The purpose of this rotation is to provide senior-level residents an expanded opportunity to participate in orthognathic and reconstructive surgical cases as a first assistant surgeon. Annually, 450-500 orthognathic surgery cases are performed at this institution and the senior resident actively participates in treatment planning and surgical management of orthognathic surgery patients, orthognathic surgery research and various in-office oral and maxillofacial surgery cases under IV sedation/general anesthesia.

Comments are closed.